Prize-Winning Kinnell Recalled as Poet like No Other

By Behe, Rege | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, January 28, 2015 | Go to article overview

Prize-Winning Kinnell Recalled as Poet like No Other


Behe, Rege, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


Galway Kinnell accomplished much in his 87 years. The Rhode Island native, who died in October, was the recipient of numerous honors, including a Pulitzer Prize, a National Book Award and the Frost Medal for poetry.

But Kinnell's contribution to poetry isn't solely measured by the awards he received. According to Pittsburgh poets who knew him or read his work, Kinnell was a unique talent who wrote poetry with a singular aspect.

"You don't find many echoes in Galway's poetry," says Sam Hazo, founder of the International Poetry Forum, which brought the world's most noted to poets to Pittsburgh from 1966 to 2009. "He doesn't imitate other poets at all. His poems are uniquely his own."

A memorial reading will be held Jan. 31 in Kinnell's honor at the East End Book Exchange in Bloomfield. Mike Schneider, who is organizing the event with fellow Pittsburgh poet Jimmy Cvetic, studied with Kinnell at the University of Pittsburgh in 1983.

"I think, of all American poets in the past century or so, he writes most deeply and passionately from his feelings," Schneider says, "in a way that is closer to the great Hispanic poets of the 20th century, (Pablo) Neruda, (Federico Pablo) Lorca and others, than most American poets."

Schneider says Kinnell's poems always paid attention to "sound qualities -- the music of words," a value he thinks has not always been emphasized by contemporary poets. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Prize-Winning Kinnell Recalled as Poet like No Other
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.