W.VA. HOUSE OF DELEGATES ; Sponsors See Issues in History Education Bill

By Quinn, Ryan | The Charleston Gazette (Charleston, WV), January 30, 2015 | Go to article overview

W.VA. HOUSE OF DELEGATES ; Sponsors See Issues in History Education Bill


Quinn, Ryan, The Charleston Gazette (Charleston, WV)


Eleven Republicans in the West Virginia House of Delegates are backing an amendment to an education law that allows school workers to face charges and potential job loss if they teach "politically correct topics before basic courses in U.S. history, geography and civics. The amendment, which has been introduced many times through the years, would add misdemeanor charges if students participate in secondary-level courses "involving the study of social problems, global economics, foreign affairs, the United Nations, world government, socialism or communism before they have received basic instruction in geography, American history and U.S., state and local government.

Delegate John Overington, R-Berkeley, who said he's been introducing the same bill for at least 10 years and, perhaps, as many as 25 years, said he didn't see the punitive aspects of the legislation until this year, when the bill received more attention than usual. Overington, who has been a lawmaker for 30 years, said he is the longest-serving delegate in the House.

"Suddenly it's exciting, he said. He said he's had calls from teachers worried about the punishments, which are part of existing state law his bill would amend.

He said he's glad his bill has pointed to language that should be removed.

The existing law threatens the misdemeanor and job removal penalties against those who don't meet certain teaching requirements concerning U.S. and state history and government, plus health education.

Overington's amendment would add that threat to those who don't teach about the geography, government and history topics before the secondary-level courses on the identified issues. "That certainly is not something that we want, Overington said, "and, like I said, I got some calls from teachers saying that you're threatening to fire us.

If the bill is taken up in committee, Overington said, he'll offer an amendment to remove the punishments. But he said he'd still vote for the bill even if others don't support taking out the punishments.

The bill (HB 2107) also requires study of the Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution, "with an emphasis on the Bill of Rights.

Some other sponsors say they also see problems in the language that might necessitate changes.

Regardless, House Education Committee Chairwoman Amanda Pasdon, R- Monongalia, said it's unlikely she'll agree to take the bill up in committee, meaning it won't progress. She said she believes Overington has the "best of intentions, but she feels the state's education system is already over-regulated and she wants to instill more local control.

"I'm a lover of American history, and I think that every kid would love to know and understand American history, Pasdon said, "but I think restricting our educators in the classroom is not what we need to do.

If passed, it's unclear how the bill would affect, if at all, current social studies education, which is based on standards that already require students to begin learning about geography and history in elementary, or primary, school, before the secondary- level grades of six through 12.

Overington said he has no data to make the case that West Virginia students aren't already learning enough about U.S. history and the nation's founding documents.

He said the need is based on the poor knowledge of history he's seen exhibited by Americans on TV shows, like in the "Watters' World segment of Fox News' "The O'Reilly Factor and the "Jaywalking segment of the former "Tonight Show with Jay Leno, in which the host asks easy questions on history or civics to random people on the street, who often are unable to give the correct answer.

He also expressed concern about cultural relativism and schools focusing more on "priorities or other topics that may be more politically correct. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

W.VA. HOUSE OF DELEGATES ; Sponsors See Issues in History Education Bill
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.