Science Won't Conform to Wyo

Wyoming Tribune-Eagle (Cheyenne, WY), April 19, 2015 | Go to article overview

Science Won't Conform to Wyo


About 1,800 years ago, King Ptolemy I of Egypt set out to capture all the knowledge in the world for the Great Library of Alexandria. He and his advisers estimated that it would take about 500,000 scrolls to collect all the knowledge of mankind. In 1949 Claude Shannon, the founder of information theory, estimated that the Library of Congress contained 100 trillion bits of information. At the time this was considered a fair guess at the total of human knowledge. A considerable part of that knowledge included the advances and discoveries of scientific inquiry through the centuries.

We had developed many breakthroughs in medicine, for example. We had laid the groundwork for computers. We had annihilated an enemy with the atomic bomb. The list of scientific discoveries and applications is long. Today the sum of knowledge that Claude Shannon speculated about in 1949 would fit on a large computer hard drive. It is much larger now. We have not stopped discovering.

We have been subjected to vast amounts of nonsense from the Legislature and others on the topic of science. Lawmakers adopted an amendment that prevented the State Board of Education from even discussing new science standards. The Legislature this year, rather sheepishly, rescinded that, and the work of the state board now proceeds, based on the Next Generation Science Standards that caused last year's stir. What the Legislature had to eat was its objection to hurting the coal industry's feelings by having our students encounter the science of climate change in the classroom. But even the coal industry knows something is happening as its participation in pollution control overtures to China show.

Meanwhile, we as a state were humiliated and laughed at for our ignorance.

The argument over the science standards is related to what is known as Common Core, a set of education guidelines promulgated by the National Governors Association, in a bipartisan initiative. Wyoming has adopted the Common Core. The Next Generation Science Standards should follow. The people who would interfere with and even dictate the tenets of a body of discovered knowledge remind me of the follies of Soviet science. Josef Stalin was obsessed with science, and he was determined to make it fit the doctrines of Soviet socialism. Soviet socialism was supposed to be "scientific." Science was supposed to be ideologically correct. Stalin edited reports on genetics and physiology and adjudicated debates among physicists. He wrote incompetent and useless essays on linguistics and political economy.

Under the initiative of Teofim Lysenko, an influential Russian scientist, the Soviet Union rejected Mendelian genetic theory. Gregor Mendel's experiments led to the formation of genetic science. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Science Won't Conform to Wyo
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.