Knicks Can't Stop Sinking

By Popper, Steve | The Record (Bergen County, NJ), January 4, 2015 | Go to article overview

Knicks Can't Stop Sinking


Popper, Steve, The Record (Bergen County, NJ)


The Knicks' injury report was released Saturday for tonight's game and the names read once again like a who's who of the players the team rested its hopes on for this season.

Carmelo Anthony, Amar'e Stoudemire and Andrea Bargnani were all doubtful. Iman Shumpert was still out. Samuel Dalembert was questionable and Tim Hardaway Jr. was upgraded to probable.

That list included four starters from opening day, as well as a player in Bargnani who was expected to provide a boost when he returned from a series of injuries that sidelined him for the first 33 games. Instead, he headed off to the locker room with a recurrence of a calf injury Friday, his second game back.

So the Knicks will take the floor at Madison Square Garden tonight reeling with 20 losses in their last 21 games, 10 consecutive defeats for the second time in a span of just over a month, to take on the Milwaukee Bucks.

And if, as they did Friday when they fell behind the lowly -- but not as low as them-- Detroit Pistons by 33 points, they hear the boos from the home crowd, they will move along, understanding just where they are now.

"Obviously the fans want you to win," Knicks coach Derek Fisher said. "But I think most importantly, they want you to give everything that you have physically and mentally to your job which is what we would assume that most of them try to do every day. So you have every right to be disappointed in the team if you feel like the effort, the energy, the fight, is not there.

"If guys aren't making shots, if the team is not playing well for various reasons, maybe it's not boo worthy. But we can't kind of manage how we do things based on whether our fans are booing or cheering. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Knicks Can't Stop Sinking
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.