China's Progress Is Not in Theft of Trade Secrets

By the Monitor's Board | The Christian Science Monitor, May 20, 2014 | Go to article overview

China's Progress Is Not in Theft of Trade Secrets


the Monitor's Board, The Christian Science Monitor


For nearly a decade, China has tried to create a strong culture of innovation among its technology researchers. The party line: Be creative, discover new ideas, and accept temporary setbacks like a Steve Jobs.

Imagine the shock then on Monday when the United States indicted five Chinese military officers for allegedly stealing secrets from several American companies such as Alcoa and Westinghouse. In accusing China of massive cyber-espionage, the US is challenging Beijing to live up to its own goal of becoming a global leader in science and technology by 2020.

"Success in the international marketplace should be based solely on a company's ability to innovate and compete, not on a sponsor government's ability to spy and steal business secrets," US Attorney General Eric Holder said in announcing the indictments.

The alleged thievery involved hackers at a spying operation near Shanghai extracting such information as nuclear plant designs and the price for solar panels from the US. The military is involved because it has a heavy hand in state-linked enterprises that dominate the Chinese economy. Many of those enterprises have lately begun to falter in global export markets.

The five suspects were named and their pictures put on the FBI's most-wanted posters - although they are unlikely to face trial in the US. The main point of the indictments is to shame China into ending its official campaign of pirating intellectual property from abroad and to speed up innovation at home.

China has many successful technology companies, such as Alibaba, Lenovo, and Huawei. But none are in the Top 100 Global Innovators (the US has 45). And much of China's progress since 1980 has been based on borrowed technology, either stolen or coerced out of foreign companies seeking to enter the large Chinese market.

As its economic growth slows, China needs to move up faster in the world's high-tech supply chain in manufacturing and software. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

China's Progress Is Not in Theft of Trade Secrets
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.