African-American Men at Risk, Activism through Social Media, Linguistic Discourse in Pakistan, Pressuring Nigerian Politicians, Mexico's Immigration Problem

By Editors | The Christian Science Monitor, August 30, 2014 | Go to article overview

African-American Men at Risk, Activism through Social Media, Linguistic Discourse in Pakistan, Pressuring Nigerian Politicians, Mexico's Immigration Problem


Editors, The Christian Science Monitor


The Irish Times / Dublin, IrelandAfrican-American men are still at risk

"Like the fatal shooting of Trayvon Martin, a black Florida teenager, by a neighbourhood watch volunteer in 2012, [Michael] Brown's killing [on Aug. 9] has highlighted the risks faced by young African-American men on account of prejudice and fear...," states an editorial. "[A]s African-Americans reflect on their condition, six years after the election of America's first black president, they see that they continue to fall behind in terms of employment, wealth and opportunity. Young black men like Brown are much more likely to be stopped by police, arrested, charged, convicted and imprisoned than their white counterparts. And more likely to be killed by the police who are supposed to protect them."

The Jakarta Post / Jakarta, IndonesiaTaking action through social media

"Indonesia with its population of more than 240 million people, most of whom are young and active on social media, has often been cited as the 'social media capital of the world' and Jakarta's citizens as the most avid tweeters compared to any other city.... Indonesia, with its 62 million active social media users ... [should use social media to] engage communities in taking action in the name of humanity and to celebrate the spirit that leads people to help those whose lives have been torn apart by natural disasters or conflicts...," writes Rajan Gengage. "Everyone can be a humanitarian. We can all do something to alleviate human suffering and we all have the ability to exhibit the spirit of humanity and of helping others."

Dawn / Karachi, PakistanPreserving indigenous languages promotes understanding

"Homogeneity lies at the core of the militant discourse that has permeated the thinking patterns of both state and society.... Homo geneity decries everything that is different, unknown or unfamiliar...," writes Khadim Hussain. "With the state increasingly supporting the discourse of homogeneity, we have seen political marginalisation that, in turn, has created deep fault lines in society.... While nobody denies the importance of English and Urdu [in Pakistan], the exclusion of indigenous languages has paved the way for a narrow discourse [which fuels militant mentality]. …

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