For Christian Millennials, Gay Marriage Debate Produces New Views on Morality

By Bruinius, Harry | The Christian Science Monitor, March 19, 2015 | Go to article overview

For Christian Millennials, Gay Marriage Debate Produces New Views on Morality


Bruinius, Harry, The Christian Science Monitor


Few were surprised when America's largest denomination of "mainline" Presbyterian Christians voted to redefine marriage Tuesday, officially changing its church constitution to extend the sacred union between "a man and a woman" to "two people, traditionally a man and a woman."

After all, the Presbyterian Church, USA, is one of the more socially liberal within the cacophonous swirl of American Protestantism, in which local congregations or regional governing bodies are often empowered to shape their own understandings of faith and Scripture.

Yet the redefinition also points to larger issues involving same- sex marriage that younger American Christians, in particular, are wrestling with. As gay and lesbian people have become a visible part of mainstream life in the past decade, many of those who have grown up with this new visibility have begun to question the previous generation's moral condemnations.

Across the denominational spectrum, Millennials - including many among the more conservative Evangelicals and Catholics - are pondering interpretations of Scripture, and they're finding new meanings of morality and Christian love. These young people are also feeling a disconnect between their church life and US society, where cultural understandings of human sexuality have been changing quickly and dramatically.

"When everywhere you go you have full equality - the military, on TV, in business ... in schools, university classes, political institutions - and only in this one outpost of culture do you have people not accepting - it forces questions for our young people," says David Gushee, a professor of Christian ethics at Mercer University in Atlanta, who is considered one of the nation's leading evangelical ethicists.

"That disjunction between a culture that is moving toward full civil equality, and a church that isn't, is very visible to our young people, and they at least want to talk about that and know what to make of that," continues Professor Gushee, who last year, in the book "Changing Our Mind," declared his support for the full inclusion of gays and lesbians in churches.

As a group, Evangelicals remain those most opposed to same-sex marriage in the United States, the Pew Research Center has found. But among white evangelical Millennials, 43 percent now favor allowing gay and lesbian couples to legally wed, up from 20 percent in 2003, according to a survey by the Public Religion Research Institute last year. And a full 85 percent of self-identified Catholics under the age of 30 say homosexuality should be accepted by society, a Pew survey from last year found.

Of course, many Christians are not embracing such ideas. After the vote by the mainline Presbyterians this week, another denomination, the conservative Presbyterian Church in America (PCA), affirmed the traditional view:

"We, like other evangelical, conservative, orthodox, and traditional Christians from many branches of the Christian faith, believe that, from creation, God ordained the marriage covenant to be a unique bond between one man and one woman," read a statement by the church, which is the second largest US denomination, with nearly 370,000 members. "This biblical understanding is what the Church has always believed, taught, and confessed. Therefore, we believe that the divinely sanctioned standard for sexual activity is fidelity within a marriage between one man and one woman or chastity outside of such a marriage."

Others, however, are celebrating this week's vote by the mainline Presbyterians, or the PC(USA), as the denomination is sometimes called.

"Our movement has witnessed extraordinary policy change for Ordination Equality and Marriage Equality in the span of five years," wrote Alex Patchin McNeill, executive director of More Light Presbyterians, in a blog post Thursday. …

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