David Greenglass, Witness against Rosenbergs, Is Dead at 92

By Mcfadden, Robert D | International New York Times, October 16, 2014 | Go to article overview

David Greenglass, Witness against Rosenbergs, Is Dead at 92


Mcfadden, Robert D, International New York Times


Testimony by Mr. Greenglass against his sister and brother-in- law, Ethel and Julius Rosenberg, in a 1951 spy trial helped send them to the electric chair.

It was the most notorious spy case of the Cold War -- the conviction and execution of Julius and Ethel Rosenberg for passing atomic secrets to the Soviet Union -- and it rested largely on the testimony of Ms. Rosenberg's brother, David Greenglass, whose name to many became synonymous with betrayal.

For his role in the conspiracy, Mr. Greenglass, an Army sergeant who had stolen nuclear intelligence from Los Alamos, N.M., went to prison for almost a decade, then changed his name and lived quietly until a journalist tracked him down. He admitted then, nearly a half- century later, that he had lied on the witness stand to save his wife from prosecution, giving testimony that he was never sure about but that nevertheless helped send his sister and her husband to the electric chair in 1953.

Mr. Greenglass died on July 1, a family member confirmed. He was 92. His family did not announce his death; The New York Times learned of it in a call to the nursing home where he had been living under his assumed name. Mr. Greenglass's wife, Ruth, who had played a minor role in the conspiracy and also gave damning testimony against the Rosenbergs, died in 2008.

In today's world, where spying has more to do with greed than ideology, the story of David Greenglass and the Rosenbergs is an enduring time capsule from an age of uncertainties -- of world war against fascism, Cold War with the Soviets, and shifting alliances that led some Americans to embrace utopian communism and others to denounce such ideas, and their exponents, as un-American.

Mr. Greenglass, who grew up in Manhattan in a household that believed Marxism would save humanity, was an ardent, preachy Communist when drafted by the Army in World War II, but no one in the barracks took him very seriously, much less believed him capable of spying.

He was not well educated, but his skills as a machinist -- and pure luck -- led to his assignment in 1944 to the Manhattan Project at Los Alamos, where America's first atomic bombs were being developed. After being picked to replace a soldier who had gone AWOL, he lied on his security clearance report and was assigned to a team making precision molds for high-explosive lenses used to detonate the nuclear core.

When Mr. Rosenberg, already a Soviet spy, learned of his brother- in-law's work, he recruited him. …

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