Bulls Guard Sees Taking a Stand as a Responsibility ; Former M.V.P. Kicked off a Trend as First to Wear 'I Can't Breathe' T-Shirt

By Strauss, Ben | International New York Times, December 12, 2014 | Go to article overview

Bulls Guard Sees Taking a Stand as a Responsibility ; Former M.V.P. Kicked off a Trend as First to Wear 'I Can't Breathe' T-Shirt


Strauss, Ben, International New York Times


In Derrick Rose's hometown of Chicago, he was already known as someone with a social conscience before he became the first N.B.A. player to don an "I Can't Breathe" T-shirt.

Derrick Rose was in his downtown apartment one night late last week with two of his oldest friends, Tim Flowers and Randall Hampton.

They all grew up on the South Side here, have known one another since middle school and played high school basketball together. Rose and Flowers even lived on the same block in Englewood, one of Chicago's rougher neighborhoods.

Now, inside the gleaming Trump Tower, they watched the streets below fill with demonstrators.

The protests followed a grand jury's decision not to indict a New York police officer after his chokehold led to the death of Eric Garner, an unarmed black man. A video of the July confrontation on Staten Island revealed Garner gasping and saying, "I can't breathe."

As the three friends watched the protest, they talked about Garner and then Michael Brown, an unarmed black teenager killed over the summer by a white police officer in Ferguson, Mo. Flowers and Rose talked about their old neighborhood, just a few miles away, where violence was a part of everyday life.

And they talked about something else, too. Rose, the backcourt star of the Chicago Bulls, had already asked Hampton to find him a shirt bearing Garner's final words, which had become a rallying cry across the country. And as the three friends sat there and talked, it became clear that Rose intended to wear the shirt and make a statement.

"That night we talked about how we supported him," Flowers said of Rose. "That wearing the shirt was an important thing to do, that it was a responsibility."

It did not take long for Rose to get the shirt. And last Saturday night, when the Bulls took on Golden State in Chicago, he wore it during warm-ups. It was black, with white letters that stated, "I Can't Breathe."

What Rose began, other N.B.A. players have continued. On Monday in Brooklyn, the Cleveland Cavaliers' LeBron James wore a similar shirt, as did a number of Nets. On Tuesday night, in Los Angeles, Kobe Bryant and his Lakers teammates wore "I Can't Breathe" shirts before they took on the Sacramento Kings. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Bulls Guard Sees Taking a Stand as a Responsibility ; Former M.V.P. Kicked off a Trend as First to Wear 'I Can't Breathe' T-Shirt
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.