New Leaders at Paris Opera Unveil an Ambitious Future ; among a Raft of Coups, Directors Secure Services of William Forsythe

By Sulcas, Roslyn | International New York Times, February 5, 2015 | Go to article overview

New Leaders at Paris Opera Unveil an Ambitious Future ; among a Raft of Coups, Directors Secure Services of William Forsythe


Sulcas, Roslyn, International New York Times


Among a raft of coups, the directors secure the services of the American choreographer William Forsythe.

In a major coup, the Paris Opera Ballet has secured one of the dance world's biggest names, William Forsythe, as the company's associate choreographer.

The news was announced on Wednesday along with other plans for the Opera's new season in September, the first programmed by Stephane Lissner, the Opera's general director since July, and Benjamin Millepied, the director of dance since November. Among the most significant plans were the creation of a Paris Opera Academy and a new digital platform, a series of ambitious new works, and an unusual level of cooperation between the opera and ballet companies.

Mr. Forsythe, who stepped down as director of the Forsythe Company in 2013, will create a new piece for the Paris Opera Ballet in 2016 that will be part of a full evening of his work, and will be the first large-scale piece he has made since 1999 for a company other than his own. Mr. Forsythe will also work with the dancers for three months each season. That period will include time spent with participants in the newly conceived academy, a training program to develop choreographers, musicians, stage directors and singers.

"He is an incredibly important choreographer who is connected to an American and Balanchine legacy, and an amazing teacher," Mr. Millepied said in an interview on Monday in his office at the Palais Garnier, before the formal season announcement at the Bastille Opera on Wednesday. "Our conversations together are all about ballet: technique, musicality, expression, precision. There is a real connection and interest we share."

Additional new pieces will come from Justin Peck (whose "In Creases" is also part of the season), Wayne McGregor, Jerome Bel and Mr. Millepied; while works by George Balanchine, Boris Charmatz, Anne Teresa De Keersmaeker, Christopher Wheeldon, Jerome Robbins, Alexei Ratmansky and Maguy Marin join the Opera repertory. There are just three full-length ballets; Nureyev's "Bayadere" and "Romeo and Juliet," and Patrice Bart and Eugene Polyakov's "Giselle."

Mr. Millepied said musical choices had been central to the commissioning of new work, with Mr. McGregor creating a piece to Pierre Boulez's "Antheme II" as part of a full-evening homage to the composer, and Mr. Peck using Poulenc's "Concerto for Two Pianos and Orchestra," which Mr. Millepied described as "a significant French score that is rarely performed."

Mr. Millepied said his programming had been strongly influenced by the history of the Paris Opera Ballet and his own experience as a dancer with the New York City Ballet. "Since Louis XIV, the idea of being a choreographer here was looked at as a craft," he said, adding: "I want to show work by people who are really skilled craftsmen." As examples, he cited Mr. Forsythe, Mr. Ratmansky and Mr. Wheeldon.

He added that the idea of teaching the craft of dance-making was behind the conception of the academy, which will offer a two-year residency to two choreographers from outside the Opera and three from the company. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

New Leaders at Paris Opera Unveil an Ambitious Future ; among a Raft of Coups, Directors Secure Services of William Forsythe
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.