National Register of Historic Places Adds Kansas Sites ; Dalton Gang Hideout, Leavenworth County Church Two of Six Additions to List of Historical Attractions

The Topeka Capital-Journal, January 25, 2015 | Go to article overview

National Register of Historic Places Adds Kansas Sites ; Dalton Gang Hideout, Leavenworth County Church Two of Six Additions to List of Historical Attractions


The Dalton Gang Hideout and Museum and Little Stranger Church and Cemetery are among the newest Kansas properties added to the National Register of Historic Places, according to the Kansas Historical Society.

On Jan. 7, the Keeper of the National Register of Historic Places entered six Kansas listings into the register and removed a fire- damaged church and a demolished bridge. The action brought the total number of Kansas listings in the National Register to 1,383.

A summary of the listings follows:

- Little Stranger Church and Cemetery in Leavenworth County.

The Little Stranger Church congregation built this wood-frame house of worship in 1868, and at the time of nomination, it stands to be the oldest wood-frame church in Kansas listed in the registers. The congregation traced its roots back to a group of settlers from Farley, Mo., who arrived in Leavenworth County in 1858. Despite the apparent success of the church in the 1910s, it closed in 1919 during the flu epidemic, never to reconvene again. The building remained shuttered until 1929 when a 4-H club requested to use the building for its meetings. Various organizations held meetings in the building through the mid-20th century. The church has a rectangular form and gable-front roof that presents a straight- forward image of utilitarian design. The associated cemetery includes more than 100 known graves, with the earliest deaths dating from the late 1850s and early 1860s, suggesting the cemetery may have pre-dated the construction of the church.

- Dalton Gang Hideout & Museum, 502 S. Pearlette St. in Meade.

The Meade Chamber of Commerce, with assistance from the Work Projects Administration and the National Youth Administration, developed the site in 1940 around the former residence of John and Eva (Dalton) Whipple, a sister of the famed outlaw Dalton brothers known for their robbery of trains and banks. Although stories of the Dalton Gang visiting Meade in the late 1800s surfaced in the early 20th century, primary source evidence to support these claims has remained elusive. Nevertheless, local officials hoped to attract visitors using the colorful Dalton Gang tales and showcase history through the collections of local history buffs at this site.

- Hotel Roberts, 120 W. 4th St. in Pratt.

Built in 1930, Hotel Roberts is the largest and most highly styled historic hotel in Pratt. Construction of the hotel was initiated by the Pratt Chamber of Commerce, which formed a committee in the late 1920s specifically to facilitate the construction of a large new hotel. The hotel was financed in part through a public subscription campaign and constructed on land provided by the Chamber. The community hospital was established on the eighth floor of the fireproof building in 1932, complete with an operating room and an X-ray machine. …

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