MOM STOP: Planning a Trip to Disney Is a Real Production

By Avant, Lydia Seabol | The Tuscaloosa News, November 14, 2014 | Go to article overview

MOM STOP: Planning a Trip to Disney Is a Real Production


Avant, Lydia Seabol, The Tuscaloosa News


There is a culture that I'm foreign to, one filled with its own language, its own abbreviations and traditions, one with passionate visitors: Disney.

Sure, I grew up watching Disney movies. I remember seeing "Aladdin" and "The Lion King" in the theater. My sister and I loved "The Little Mermaid," and I once dressed up as Snow White for Halloween.

But my generation largely predates the Disney princess obsession that has stricken little girls for the last 20 years. No matter how much I've tried to avoid it, my 5-year-old daughter is not immune. Sure, she knew all the princesses long before the movie "Frozen" came out. But "Frozen" changed everything.

For the past year, Anna and Elsa have invaded our household. Our daughter's dress-up bin is now overflowing with princess dresses, her room scattered with random plastic high-heel dress-up shoes and crowns.

Our daughter lives and breathes Disney. Even our son, 3, has been sucked into the madness, loving "Frozen" but also Pixar movies like "Planes" and "Cars."

We aren't one of those families that vacations at Disney World every year. Yes, we've been to Disneyland while visiting relatives in California. But a Disney World vacation seemed daunting.

When I was growing up, my family didn't do Disney; we went camping or to the beach, went on a road trip of national parks out West. I've visited Disney World twice in my life -- the last time in 1993. My husband hasn't been since the 1980s.

And so, taking into account our kids' Disney obsession, we decided this year would be the year we'd take the Disney dive.

I made reservations far in advance, but had no clue about the planning involved. …

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