A Healthy Partnership Cmu Helps Marc Incorporate Behavior Theory into Advertising

By Lindeman, Teresa | Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA), May 23, 2014 | Go to article overview

A Healthy Partnership Cmu Helps Marc Incorporate Behavior Theory into Advertising


Lindeman, Teresa, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA)


The American Heart Association wanted people to call 911 when they felt symptoms that might indicate a heart attack. Research showed people didn't always do that.

It wasn't that they didn't know the symptoms. Plenty of ads over the years have shown an older man or an older woman, maybe with hand on chest, describing the signs of a life-threatening problem.

"Most of those campaigns were not very memorable," said Alex Kuhn, senior director of Mission: Lifeline, the association's effort to improve heart attack care, for the health association affiliate that covers Pennsylvania, Ohio, Delaware, West Virginia and Kentucky.

Heart attack victims still do things like drive themselves to the hospital or have a friend take them in, delaying by minutes or even hours care that could make a difference.

Could marketing agency Marc USA come up with something to get people to pick up their phones instead?

The Station Square agency has been integrating behavioral economics, or the psychology of decision making, into its marketing efforts through a several years-long relationship with Carnegie Mellon University.

"It's not traditional research," said Michele Fabrizi, president and CEO at Marc. "The reality is all about getting into the deep emotion."

A year ago, Marc and CMU officially announced a strategic alliance, but the connection started several years earlier and led to projects like a mammography awareness campaign for Carle Foundation Hospital in Urbana, Ill., in which women could easily make appointments and send "mammo-grams" to remind others to do so, too.

Marc isn't the first marketing agency to embrace behavioral economics. Increasingly, businesses have started to chase the kind of insights found in the research coming out of academic circles.

People make decisions every day about everything from gambling to choosing tires to which grocery store to shop at or whether to call emergency medical responders.

Although the marketing industry has experience in developing programs and messages to convince people to buy things or act in certain ways, there's growing interest in approaching the problems differently.

First, the book "Freakonomics" popularized the concept of applying economic theory to all sorts of behaviors. In 2008, the book "Nudge" came along to talk about how the framing of choices can be used to help people make better decisions and the U.K. government began trying to apply those theories.

Carey K. Morewedge, associate professor of marketing at Carnegie Mellon's Tepper School of Business, described research that found individuals are more wary of losses than eager for gains, for example. Turns out most aren't willing to take a risk that might lose $20 unless they simultaneously have a chance or winning $40 or $50. …

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