Southern Comfort? Not from the Sec

By Bianchi, Mike | Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA), June 8, 2014 | Go to article overview

Southern Comfort? Not from the Sec


Bianchi, Mike, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA)


George O'Leary is starting to wonder if the Southeastern Conference is being governed by league commissioner Mike Slive or Confederate President Jefferson Davis.

O'Leary, the blunt, straightforward coach of the UCF Knights, compares the SEC's recent threat to break away from the rest of major college football and start its own division to the Confederacy's decision to break away from the United States and risk the sovereign unity of college football.

"They sound like the South during the Civil War," O'Leary said of the SEC and the other saber-rattlers in the so-called Power 5 conferences. "If they don't get their way, they're going to secede and start their own country. ... I think college football is in real trouble."

Perhaps it's not just coincidence that the first three letters of "secede" are S-E-C. When it comes to college football, it seems, the South truly has risen again.

O'Leary is certainly not the first to compare the SEC to the Confederacy of the Civil War. There are some historians who truly believe SEC football dominance emanates from the South's loss to the North in the Civil War. They claim this provincial angst is why SEC schools so adamantly pursued excellence in college football; because it gave them a chance at a symbolic rematch with those "damn Yankees." In 1935, the SEC became the first conference to offer athletic scholarships, which outraged Harvard, Yale and the other hoity-toity institutions of higher learning in the Northeast.

"The Civil War had crushed the ego of the South," writes author Ray Glier in his recent book "How the SEC Became Goliath." "The North was more urbanized and industrialized. It's why the North won the war and the South wanted to raise the level of its game. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Southern Comfort? Not from the Sec
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.