Still Super after All These Years Today's Supercomputers Remain at the Front Edge of Technology

By Michael Levine; Ralph Roskies | Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA), June 22, 2014 | Go to article overview

Still Super after All These Years Today's Supercomputers Remain at the Front Edge of Technology


Michael Levine; Ralph Roskies, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA)


Computing and information processing have become so intertwined with the activities of our daily lives that we often no longer notice it.

Thanks to advances in everyday computing applications, our telephones are actually powerful computers that serve as our 24- hour concierges, connecting us, managing our time, entertaining us and serving as an encyclopedia of a surprising proportion of world knowledge. The newest smartphones are now as powerful as the Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center's first supercomputer in 1986, which cost $18 million!

As individuals and companies, we have benefitted from commercial computing applications that help us coordinate electronic documents between individuals on different continents, conduct video meetings as if everyone were in the same room and outsource development of the specialized computer programs and hardware required by small companies without the monetary and personnel expense of creating them in-house.

Not only are these many services of immense value to us, offering them is sufficiently profitable to the private sector to drive them forward at an astonishing rate.

In addition to the benefits offered by these chiefly commercial products, however, we derive many benefits from a host of computing and information processing resources that are less familiar and more focused on the long term. These resources tackle a set of larger, societally important tasks that require specialized computers at the very front edge of technical performance: supercomputers.

The range of supercomputing's achievements have been impressive: Today, supercomputers allow us to calculate the location and timing of hurricanes and tornados in a manner that is timely and accurate enough to guide public safety efforts and save lives. Supercomputers help match the genetics of donor organs with recipients to achieve faster, better matches and help create 3D printers that may someday build perfectly matched replacement organs from scratch. Supercomputers have identified unintended consequences of stock market rules, helping to create better rules that encourage more transparent, stable and fair markets. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Still Super after All These Years Today's Supercomputers Remain at the Front Edge of Technology
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.