It's the Loyalty, Stupid Robin Williams Made Us Laugh; Hillary Clinton Makes Us Wonder

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA), August 14, 2014 | Go to article overview

It's the Loyalty, Stupid Robin Williams Made Us Laugh; Hillary Clinton Makes Us Wonder


I talked to Robin Williams once, about breasts.

In 1993, when he played a prim British nanny in "Mrs. Doubtfire," I went to interview him at his Pacific Heights house.

"It's great to be this blue-mouthed old lady hitting on somebody," he said, in his character's soft Scottish burr, "opening your blouse and saying, 'What about these? Behold my dirty pillows, my fun bags. Come nurse at the fountain of bliss.' "

He was 42 then, wearing his Popeye outfit, a blue-striped T- shirt and black baggy jeans. Surrounded by kids, a rabbit and an iguana, we talked about everything from John Belushi to his father, a stern Ford Motor Co. executive.

As our interview ended, I was telling him about my friend Michael Kelly's idea for a 1-900 number, not one to call Asian beauties or Swedish babes, but where you'd have an amorous chat with a repressed Irish woman. Mr. Williams delightedly riffed on the caricature, playing the role of an older Irish woman answering the sex line in a brusque brogue, ordering a horny caller to go to the devil with his impure thoughts.

I couldn't wait to play the tape for Mr. Kelly, who doubled over in laughter.

So when I think of Robin Williams, I think of Michael Kelly. And when I think of Michael Kelly, I think of Hillary Clinton, because Michael was the first American reporter to die in the Iraq invasion and Hillary was one of the 29 Democratic senators who voted to authorize that baloney war.

The woman who always does her homework, the woman who resigned as president of Wellesley College's Young Republicans over the Vietnam War, made that vote without even bothering to read the National Intelligence Estimate and its skimpy evidence.

It was obvious in real time that the George W. Bush crew was arbitrarily switching countries, blaming 9/11 on Saddam Hussein so they'd get more vivid vengeance targets and a chance to shake up the Middle East chessboard. Officials were shamelessly making up the threat as they went along.

For me to believe that Hillary would be a good president, I would need to feel that she had learned something from that deadly, globe- shattering vote - a calculated attempt to be tough and show that, as a Democratic woman, she was not afraid to use power.

Yet, she's still at it.

With the diplomatic finesse of a wrecking ball, the former diplomat gave an interview to Jeffrey Goldberg, a hawk, of The Atlantic - a calculated attempt to be tough and show that, as a Democratic woman, she's not afraid to use power.

Channeling her pal John McCain, she took a cheap shot at President Barack Obama when his approval rating on foreign policy had dropped to 36 percent, calling him a wimp just as he was preparing for airstrikes against the Islamic State militant group. …

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