Charges Dropped over Mistaken Id

By Navratil, Liz | Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA), August 14, 2014 | Go to article overview

Charges Dropped over Mistaken Id


Navratil, Liz, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA)


Bryan Gibbons had been arrested before for stealing and pawning jewelry.

But when Allegheny County homicide detectives brought him in for an interview and peppered him with questions for 10 hours about a Kennedy man's death and the theft of jewelry and other items from his home, Mr. Gibbons said he was baffled.

"They wanted information from me that I didn't have or didn't know," said Mr. Gibbons, 29, of Hampton.

Mr. Gibbons said he would have helped, but he couldn't. Police charged Mr. Gibbons on July 25 with receiving stolen property, relying on the identification of a Sharpsburg pawn shop employee who was shown a photo array and pointed him out as the man who tried to sell the stolen jewelry.

That charge was withdrawn Wednesday. A detective on the case contacted the Allegheny County district attorney's office and said "there was a mistaken identity and Gibbons was not the person who tried to sell the jewelry at the pawn shop," said Mike Manko, spokesman for the Allegheny County district attorney.

County homicide Lt. Andrew Schurman did not respond to requests for comment Wednesday. The witness declined comment.

The arrest of people based solely on witness identification has been a controversial topic lately.

"This is a case where it has its flaws," said Casey White, Mr. Gibbons' attorney.

Pittsburgh police and the DA's office have argued recently about whether officers should use sequential or simultaneous photo arrays. In a sequential array, witnesses are shown photos of possible suspects one at a time; in a simultaneous array, they are shown photos of several people, side by side.

Court documents show that an employee at a Sharpsburg pawn shop selected Mr. Gibbons after he was shown photos one at a time.

"It's scary," Mr. White said, noting that he's about the same age and build as his client and just as easily could have ended up in the array. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Charges Dropped over Mistaken Id
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.