At 102, He's Still Giving Back Fellow Volunteers Say Bernie Queneau Inspires Them

By Carpenter, Deana | Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA), August 14, 2014 | Go to article overview

At 102, He's Still Giving Back Fellow Volunteers Say Bernie Queneau Inspires Them


Carpenter, Deana, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA)


Bernard "Bernie" Queneau has earned the right to brag about his accomplishments, which include serving as a Naval commander in World War II, laboring in steel mills, earning bachelor's and master's degrees from Columbia University as well as teaching there, and earning a doctorate from the University of Minnesota.

And at 102, he is still going strong as a volunteer at Mt. Lebanon Public Library, Meals on Wheels and St. Clair Hospital. A library colleague describes his life as "inspirational."

In the summer of 1941, Mr. Queneau married Henrietta Nye. He joked that he had to go AWOL from the Navy to do so.

"I got married and reported for duty the next Monday," he said.

They raised their three children in Upper St. Clair: Jean Davis, now 72; Anne Queneau, 70; and Margot Marsh, 66. Mr. Queneau has four grandchildren, five great-grandchildren and another on the way.

His wife died of cancer in 1970. Mr. Queneau later married Mary Goettge, who died in 1999 after a long battle with Alzheimer's disease.

In 2003, at the age of 91, Mr. Queneau said he found love again and married Esther McNaull Oyster. They live in Mt. Lebanon.

"Esther said yes to a 91-year-old. That's what you call a gambler," Mr. Queneau said with a laugh. He recalls the first time he met her family - at a reunion attended by about 44 of her relatives and, as he says, "One Bernie."

"They asked me if I had any piercings," he said with a laugh.

After putting him through the ringer at that reunion, Mr. Queneau said he knew he liked her family and that sealed the deal.

The couple volunteers together at Mt. Lebanon Public Library's used-book store, the Book Cellar. Volunteering is something Mr. Queneau has done since retiring nearly 30 years ago from his job as general manager of quality assurance at U.S. Steel. He recently was honored for volunteering more than 2,500 hours at St. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

At 102, He's Still Giving Back Fellow Volunteers Say Bernie Queneau Inspires Them
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.