Detective Details Suicide Letter Written by Ferrante to Children

By Ward, Paula Reed | Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA), October 29, 2014 | Go to article overview

Detective Details Suicide Letter Written by Ferrante to Children


Ward, Paula Reed, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA)


Robert Ferrante sat at the defense table, his hands clasped under his chin, glasses off, a tear streaming down his cheek as an Allegheny County detective read letters he wrote - but later shredded - to his children.

The goodbye letters, to his sister, two adult children and then 6-year-old daughter, were written on May 10, 2013. The same date he wrote a suicide letter, as well.

"While I remain steadfastly adamant I did not take Autumn's life, I no longer have the strength to carry the weight of losing her. ... It has been too great a weight for me to carry. I feel as a pariah in my community."

The letters, read into the record by Detective Jackelyn Weibel, were the most compelling evidence during a day packed with it. Mr. Ferrante is accused of killing his wife, Dr. Autumn Klein, in April 2013. The chief of women's neurology for UPMC Presbyterian and Magee-Womens hospitals collapsed on April 17 and died three days later.

Earlier Tuesday, Dr. Klein's mother testified about what she called Mr. Ferrante's "fake" emotion when she arrived at the couple's home from Maryland the morning after the collapse, and later Tuesday, a state trooper recounted the dozens of searches conducted and websites visited on a laptop computer found locked inside a safe in Mr. Ferrante's lab office.

But it was the letters that captured the day.

Discovered in a shredder in the home office of Mr. Ferrante during a search on May 28, the letters had to be reconstructed by investigators.

"It was a very tedious process," Detective Weibel said.

The suicide letter addressed to his children and sister expresses his love for them and regret.

"The memories I have had with each one of you, and as a family together, would carry multiple lifetimes for any person," he wrote. "I want you to remember those times and keep them close to your heart and in your mind, not the horrific and inexplicable events that have happened over the past three weeks.

"This experience has taken an incredible toll on me - one that I can no longer burden."

Mr. Ferrante, now 66, implores his adult children, Kimberly and Michael, to care for his younger daughter.

"Let her know how deeply I love her and how important it is for her to belong to this family, and that I will be with her in spirit forever."

He concluded with, "I am so sorry for not physically remaining in your lives. I am with Autumn."

The letters to Mr. Ferrante's children recounted their childhoods, favorite memories he had with them and his pride at who they had become.

"Your success has been nothing short of remarkable, just stellar," he wrote to his daughter, Kimberly, a physician. "I am so very proud of who you are and what you have become. It is imperative that you remain focused and become the best at what you do, if not for anything else, but in memory of me. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Detective Details Suicide Letter Written by Ferrante to Children
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.