The Nitty Gritty on Buckwheat Scones

By Eskin, Leah | Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA), October 31, 2014 | Go to article overview

The Nitty Gritty on Buckwheat Scones


Eskin, Leah, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA)


Ann and I always meet at the coffee shop. There, our toddlers used to puzzle over Traffic Jam. There, our husbands used to argue over the news. It's where we slouched, years ago, when I told her we were moving. When I'm back in town we still meet at the coffee shop, and this time she told me she was moving too.

We split a scone. It was gritty. That's buckwheat, cousin to tart rhubarb and bitter sorrel. It grows in tough conditions - poor soil, tight spaces, steep cliffs. It has the texture of dry sand and the color of wet sand. It's strangely satisfying.

We talked about the moves, the husbands, the toddlers now negotiating real traffic jams. We broke off bites of buckwheat but left the scone's crown of raspberry jam. Maybe next time we'll feel like something sweet.

BUCKWHEAT SCONES

Prep: 25 minutes

Bake: 20 minutes

Makes: About 12

Ingredients

3/4 cup rolled oats

6 tablespoons sugar

3/4 cup buckwheat flour

1/3 cup all-purpose flour

1/2 teaspoon finely grated orange zest

1 teaspoon baking powder

3/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1/2 teaspoon baking soda

1/4 teaspoon fine salt

1/8 teaspoon ground cardamom

6 tablespoons unsalted butter, cut up

About 1/2 cup heavy cream

To finish:

Raspberry jam

Heavy cream

Sugar

Directions

Buzz: Measure 6 tablespoons of the oats and the sugar into the food processor. …

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