A Bumpy Transition to Screen for 'Horns'

By Vancheri, Barbara | Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA), October 31, 2014 | Go to article overview

A Bumpy Transition to Screen for 'Horns'


Vancheri, Barbara, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA)


In "Horns," the biblical references are rife: The Garden of Eden, fallen angels, devil horns, burning in hell.

Daniel Radcliffe, further leaving the orbit of Harry Potter behind, is Ignatius "Ig" Perrish, a disc jockey who falls from grace - and happiness - in his small Northwestern town with the symbolic name of Gideon.

The movie provides a glimpse of his idyllic relationship before a hungover Ig wakes up to protesters outside his window toting signs with inflammatory messages calling him a murderer, condemning him to hell and asking, "How could you?"

He insists he didn't - murder his longtime girlfriend, Merrin Williams (Juno Temple), and leave her body in the woods. "When they looked at me, they saw a devil and maybe I did, too," Ig says in the narration, not long before he starts to look the part by sprouting horns.

A funny thing happens when the horns, more like those of a ram or satyr, appear. They prompt relatives and strangers alike to confess their darkest, most craven impulses and to speak the truth in a way they never would otherwise. The veil of civility and the little white lies or whoppers that allow people to get through the day are gone; even Ig's parents express some hurtful thoughts.

The physical manifestation of evil also prompts Ig to use his newfound powers to try to solve Merrin's murder and it turns him into an avenging fallen angel in the supernatural thriller from director Alexandre Aja ("High Tension," "The Hills Have Eyes," "Mirrors" and "Piranha 3-D"). …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

A Bumpy Transition to Screen for 'Horns'
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.