Liberals Exploit Race and Gender They Can Find Racism and Sexism Everywhere

By Kelly, Jack | Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA), January 25, 2015 | Go to article overview

Liberals Exploit Race and Gender They Can Find Racism and Sexism Everywhere


Kelly, Jack, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA)


When People magazine asked Michelle Obama last month about her "personal experience" with racism, she cited a 2011 visit to a Target store in Virginia.

"The only person who came up to me in the store was a woman who asked me to help her take something off a shelf," the first lady said. "Because she didn't see me as the first lady, she saw me as someone who could help her. Those kinds of things happen in life."

Why is it "racist" for a short white woman to ask a much taller woman (Ms. Obama is 5 feet, 11 inches) who happens to be black to get a box of detergent for her from a high shelf?

Racism and sexism are nearly as rampant in America today as half a century ago, some liberals suggest. The first lady's anecdote illustrates how difficult it is to find evidence to support this charge.

The greatest civil rights leader dreamed in 1963 "that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character."

Jim Crow was killed by the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965. Since the 1970s, blacks have been admitted to colleges and universities with grades and test scores below those of other students, been given preference in hiring for many jobs. For decades now, Martin Luther King's dream has largely been true.

Unthinkable in 1968, improbable in 1988, Americans in 2008 elected a (half) black man president of the United States. But there are those who say the fact that many who voted for Barack Obama have since soured on him proves racism endures.

The growth and impoverishment of the black underclass in cities governed for decades by Democrats is our greatest domestic tragedy. Blaming it on mostly mythical white racism obscures the real causes, prevents solutions.

But if liberals acknowledged the progress that's been made, more blacks might wonder why all the "help" they've gotten from Democrats has done them so little good. So they pretend every year is 1963. …

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