Customs and Border Protection Authorization Act Can Improve Trade, Training and Stakeholder Engagement at the Border

Roll Call, June 10, 2014 | Go to article overview

Customs and Border Protection Authorization Act Can Improve Trade, Training and Stakeholder Engagement at the Border


The U.S. - Mexico Border Mayors Association is heartened by Congressional steps these past few weeks to formally authorize the security functions of U.S. Customs and Border Protection for the first time since the Department of Homeland Security was created in 2002.

Last month, the House Homeland Security Committee's Subcommittee on Border and Maritime Security discussed and passed the CBP Authorization Act. Congress has never authorized CBP to perform the mission it does today, and this legislation provides an opportunity to do just that.

Unlike other federal agencies, CBP performs the dual mission of securing our homeland while also facilitating legitimate trade and travel across our country's ports of entry. The full House Homeland Security Committee will also soon have a chance to review and revise H.R. 3846 which, if enacted, would go far in helping the Department of Homeland Security build a truly unified workforce within CBP.

Cities along the southwest border have for years borne the brunt of border security policy enacted by Congress, often without close collaboration of elected officials, community and business leaders who actually live and work in border communities. Border security should not be only measured by how many miles of fence we construct along the U.S.-Mexico border. Rather, security should be measured by how well we protect our country and region's vital interests: our people, our economy, and our infrastructure among them.

Security, for example, should be measured not only by how many criminals CBP catches, but also how quickly they process legitimate trade and travel through our ports of entry. Cross-border trade with Mexico contributes to 6 million American jobs throughout the United States. In Texas alone, nearly half a million jobs rely on the $86 billion of trade with Mexico. However, annual delays at our land ports of entry cost 26,000 U.S. jobs and $6 billion in lost economic output. Much of these delays are a result of inadequate and outdated port infrastructure and significant staffing gaps within CBP. The act attempts to bridge this gap and places the responsibility of trade facilitation, port modernization, and personnel management directly with the commissioner of CBP.

Given the number of people that engage with CBP every day, Congress must ensure that the CBP establishes clear standards of professional conduct for its officers and agents. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Customs and Border Protection Authorization Act Can Improve Trade, Training and Stakeholder Engagement at the Border
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.