Traffic Accidents Exact a Heavy Toll, Federal Study Finds

By Leiser, Ken | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), June 1, 2014 | Go to article overview

Traffic Accidents Exact a Heavy Toll, Federal Study Finds


Leiser, Ken, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


Motor vehicle crashes are hitting Americans squarely in the pocketbook, according to a new federal study that found traffic accidents in the year 2010 resulted in nearly $871 billion in economic loss and societal harm.

The study by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration found that crashes can lead to productivity losses, property damage, medical costs, increased traffic congestion, legal costs and the need for expensive emergency medical services.

"No amount of money can replace the life of a loved one, or stem the suffering associated with motor vehicle crashes," U.S. Secretary of Transportation Anthony Foxx said in a prepared statement.

"While the economic and societal costs of crashes are staggering, (the study) clearly demonstrates that investments in safety are worth every penny."

The study found that straight economic losses from the accidents amounted to $277 billion, or $897 for every U.S. citizen. There were nearly 33,000 fatalities, 3.9 million nonfatal injuries and almost 24 million damaged vehicles in 2010, according to the report.

Other findings included:

* Alcohol consumption remains a major cause of vehicular crashes. Alcohol-related crashes resulted in 13,323 traffic deaths, 430,000 nonfatal injuries, and $59.4 billion in economic losses that year.

* Crashes involving excessive speed resulted in 10,536 fatalities, 800,000 nonfatal injuries and damage to 3 million vehicles in crashes that resulted only in property damage.

* More than 3,350 people were killed and 54,300 more were seriously injured because they weren't buckled up with seat belts. The cost to society here was $13.8 billion.

* The economic cost of vehicular accidents, the report concluded, was the equivalent of 1.9 percent of the gross domestic product in 2010.

The societal harm, such as the lost quality of life, was measured as $870.8 billion, or roughly three times the economic losses alone, the study found.

The study was issued at a time when actual motor vehicle fatalities have been on a gradual decline, and when Americans as a group generally have been driving less than in years past.

For example, Missouri traffic deaths last year reached their lowest levels since 1947, according to state highway safety officials.

Q. Has the intersection of Hanley and Manchester roads ever had a crosswalk light and, if so, how long has it been since there was a crosswalk light at this intersection? …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Traffic Accidents Exact a Heavy Toll, Federal Study Finds
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.