Duckworth Challenge of Kirk Begins a Battle over Biographies, Definition

By Raasch, Chuck | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), March 31, 2015 | Go to article overview

Duckworth Challenge of Kirk Begins a Battle over Biographies, Definition


Raasch, Chuck, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


WASHINGTON * Battles over biography and ideology intensified Monday with the announcement that U.S. Rep. Tammy Duckworth of Illinois will seek the Senate seat held by Republican Mark Kirk.

Duckworth, 47, announced in a YouTube video Monday morning that she was running. The video is highly biographical, indicating Duckworth will lean heavily on her personal story in what could be one of the most-watched Senate races in the country next year.

Duckworth, D-Schaumburg, lost both legs when the Army helicopter she was flying was hit by a rocket-propelled grenade in 2004 in the Iraq war. She became an example of the increasing role women are playing in combat, and Democrats embraced her as an example of their commitment to defense and veterans.

She went on to become director of the Illinois Department of Veterans Affairs and then served as an assistant secretary in the federal Department of Veterans Affairs early in President Barack Obama's administration.

In the video, Duckworth vowed to "fight my heart out to represent you with honor and integrity," and she highlighted a bill she sponsored saying members of Congress should get no pay unless they pass a budget.

Born in Thailand, she is the first Asian-American woman member of the U.S. House from Illinois. She and her husband, Bryan, had their first child, Abigail, in November.

She describes herself as the "daughter of a Marine, a wife, a new mom and a combat vet."

If Duckworth wins the Democratic nomination and at least three other U.S. House members from Illinois are reportedly considering a run her race against Kirk would feature two politicians who have faced significant physical handicaps.

Kirk, 55, suffered a stroke in 2012 and still has left-side weakness and uses a wheelchair. Some recent events have been aimed at showing he is up for the challenge of another term, including his annual climb up part of Chicago's Willis Tower as part of the fundraiser SkyRiseChicago, for the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Duckworth Challenge of Kirk Begins a Battle over Biographies, Definition
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.