Bradley Retells History of U.S.-China Relations

By Levins, Harry | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), May 3, 2015 | Go to article overview

Bradley Retells History of U.S.-China Relations


Levins, Harry, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


Historian James Bradley details a long spell of American misunderstandings about China in "The China Mirage," subtitled "The Modern History of American Disaster in Asia."

Bradley says that when American missionaries and merchants returned from 19th-century China, they spoke grandly of a nation filled with humble peasants whose American-style dreams reflected Jesus and Jefferson.

In World War II, an American senator Kenneth Wherry of Nebraska said, "With God's help, we will lift Shanghai up and up, ever up until it is just like Kansas City." Bradley's message seems to be that Shanghai was (and remains) content to remain Shanghai.

The warm-and-fuzzy portrait of China stemmed in part from publisher Henry Luce, whose Time, Life and Fortune magazines had a huge impact in the '30s and '40s, before television and social media, and from novelist Pearl Buck of "The Good Earth" fame. Both had been born in China to missionary families. But Bradley insists that neither knew the real China.

Bradley also adds some chapters about Japan. Early in the book, President Theodore Roosevelt looks the other way as Japan invades and subdues Korea. Bradley says that in the late summer of 1941, the State Department's Dean Acheson slyly and single-handedly dried up sales of American oil to Japan. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Bradley Retells History of U.S.-China Relations
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.