Corinna del Greco Lobner, Longtime TU Professor of Italian, Dies at 87

By World, Tim Stanley | Tulsa World (Tulsa, OK), May 22, 2014 | Go to article overview

Corinna del Greco Lobner, Longtime TU Professor of Italian, Dies at 87


World, Tim Stanley, Tulsa World (Tulsa, OK)


An Italian Renaissance-style villa was about the last thing Corrina Lobner expected to find when she moved to Tulsa.

But as surprises go, it was a welcome one.

As she once put it, Tulsa's Philbrook Museum of Art and its accompanying gardens were so authentic, they would fit right in among the hills of her native Florence, Italy.

A professor of Italian language and literature at the University of Tulsa, Lobner would spend a lot of time over the years at the museum and gardens, where she once led tours and presented lectures.

She loved her homeland and its language, and she wanted her students and new friends in Tulsa to feel the same way.

"Most of the language resounds with the word 'amore' -- love," she told the Tulsa Tribune once, adding that she wanted everyone "to fall in love with Italian."

"You must understand the heart of the culture and its people to truly speak the language."

Corinna Del Greco Lobner died May 15. She was 87.

A memorial Mass was held Tuesday at Franciscan Villa in Broken Arrow. Arrangements were by the Cremation Society.

Although the former Corinna Del Greco was confident that the Italian people would bounce back, Italy after World War II was not the homeland she had known.

Her parents and a sister had survived, too, but they lost many other family members. The destruction she witnessed "thwarted something inside me. When you see what war does ... you change," she said later.

She soon left Italy behind, marrying an American G.I. and moving to the U.S.

Lobner and her new husband, Wesley Lobner, would settle in Racine, Wisconsin, where she would go on to earn a bachelor's degree from Dominican College.

Following it with a master's in comparative literature from the University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee, she taught for several years at Dominican. …

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