Pothole Poetry: Gazette Readers Chime in with Rhyme and Verse on Colorado Springs' Weather-Ravaged Roads

The Gazette (Colorado Springs, CO), June 8, 2015 | Go to article overview

Pothole Poetry: Gazette Readers Chime in with Rhyme and Verse on Colorado Springs' Weather-Ravaged Roads


If only poems could patch potholes ...

Last month, we asked readers to channel their frustrations about the city's weather-ravaged roads into verse for The Gazette's pothole poetry contest. Based on the response - more than 120 entries - the exercise served to get creative (and humorous) wheels spinning.

Enjoy the judges' top picks, along with the winning entry by Barbara Lewis of Colorado Springs, whose poem, "There Was a Big Pothole," was inspired by a popular nursery rhyme - and a harrowing drive to work.

"It evolved over several days on my daily commute up Academy, trying to avoid the potholes," said Lewis, who wins a free tire balance, rotation and alignment from Big O Tires.

There Was a Big Pothole

There was a big pothole that swallowed my car.

That was bizarre; it swallowed my car, which is missing so far.

There was a big pothole that swallowed a pickup.

With barely a hiccup, it swallowed a pickup.

The pickup went there to find my car.

That was bizarre; it swallowed my car, which is missing so far.

There was a big pothole that swallowed a tow truck.

We were having no luck when it swallowed the tow truck.

The tow truck went there to pick up the pickup.

The pickup went there to find my car.

That was bizarre; it swallowed my car, which is missing so far.

There was a big pothole that swallowed a grader,

a good-sized backhoe and a large excavator.

Those all went there to pull out the tow truck.

The tow truck went there to pick up the pickup.

The pickup went there to find my car.

That was bizarre; it swallowed my car, which is missing so far.2

There was a big pothole that swallowed a street.

Oh what a feat! It swallowed a street.

The street fell in on top of a fleet,

that included a grader, a good-sized backhoe and a large excavator.

Those all went there to pull out the tow truck.

The tow truck went there to pick up the pickup.

The pickup went there to find my car.

That was bizarre; it swallowed my car, which is missing so far.

There was a big pothole that swallowed a block.

That was a shock when it swallowed a block.

The block fell in on top of the street.

The street fell in on top of a fleet,

that included a grader, a good-sized backhoe and a large excavator.

Those all went there to pull out the tow truck.

The tow truck went there to pick up the pickup.

The pickup went there to find my car.

That was bizarre; it swallowed my car, which is missing so far.

There was a big pothole that swallowed a city.

It wasn't pretty, when we lost a whole city.

The city fell in on top of the block.

The block fell in on top of the street.

The street fell in on top of a fleet,

that included a grader, a good-sized backhoe and a large excavator.

Those all went there to pull out the tow truck.

The tow truck went there to pick up the pickup.

The pickup went there to find my car.

That was bizarre; it swallowed my car, which is missing so far.

As for my car, I'm resigned to its fate.

And I'm getting a bit concerned for my state.

- Barbara Lewis

Sung to "Stuck In the Middle With You" by Stealers Wheel

Well I don't know why I drove here today,

Got the feeling this rain ain't goin' away,

I get so scared I'm gonna blow out my tire,

Can't be late or I just might get fired.

Potholes to the left of me,

Potholes to the right,

Here I am, stuck inside Goodyear again.

Yes, I'm stuck inside Goodyear again.

And I'm wondering what the heck will it cost?

And I don't know what I'll tell my boss

I get so scared I'm gonna not get aligned,

I think the streets need fixed, oh, it's time

Potholes to the left of me,

Potholes to the right,

Here I am, stuck inside Goodyear again. …

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