Postpartum Depression Hits Fathers, Too but Only a Small Percentage of Depressed Dads Seek Help, Writes Chatham Psychology Professor Anthony Isacco

By Isacco, Anthony | Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA), June 21, 2015 | Go to article overview

Postpartum Depression Hits Fathers, Too but Only a Small Percentage of Depressed Dads Seek Help, Writes Chatham Psychology Professor Anthony Isacco


Isacco, Anthony, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA)


There are more than 70 million fathers in the United States. Most will celebrate Father's Day by doing the typical stuff - going to the golf course, pulling on a new pair of socks and spending time with their children and family.

For me and my family, Father's Day is a pretty relaxed day - I try to go for a run, drink a good cup of coffee (black) and have some fun with my four "live-wires," a.k.a. my daughters. The comedian Jim Gaffigan has a great bit about having four kids - to summarize, imagine yourself drowning in the ocean and, instead of a life preserver, someone hands you a baby.

For some fathers, however, it may be difficult to celebrate Father's Day because having children is not always a laughing matter. There are a lot of depressed dads out there.

Statistics are tough to come by, but as many as 10 percent of fathers may experience depression in the postpartum period. Common symptoms include loss of interest in previously enjoyed activities, depressed mood, difficulty concentrating, noticeable weight fluctuations and social withdrawal. Fathers may experience atypical signs or a "masked" depression such as anger, irritability, excessive alcohol use and other self-destructive and aggressive behaviors.

I recently conducted a study of 2,000 fathers. I was shocked that only about 3.2 percent had sought counseling in the past year. Studies show that men seek help for depression at far lower rates than women, but only 3.2 percent! I thought that 3.2 percent might accidentally stumble into a counseling office.

Depression and not seeking counseling services seemed to go hand- in-hand. The problem is that the fathers who need help because they are depressed are not receiving it because they are depressed. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Postpartum Depression Hits Fathers, Too but Only a Small Percentage of Depressed Dads Seek Help, Writes Chatham Psychology Professor Anthony Isacco
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.