Katherine Ogilvie Musgrave

Bangor Daily News (Bangor, ME), June 23, 2015 | Go to article overview

Katherine Ogilvie Musgrave


ORONO - Katherine Ogilvie Musgrave was still a frisky Tennessee filly at 95--she kept her fiercely independent spirit, her double passion for learning and nutrition, her remarkable frugality, her strong opinions, her never-ending energy, and her deep love for her family and friends until her death on June 20, 2015. She was born February 8, 1920, in Allisona, TN, daughter of Walter William and Kathleen Smith Ogilvie. She was valedictorian in her senior year of high school, and she received a Bachelor of Science degree cum laude from Maryville College in 1941. She served a dietetic internship at Vanderbilt University Medical School and remained there on the staff.

In 1944, she married Stanley Dean Musgrave, and in the following years, Katherine worked at the University of Alabama Medical School, the Burnham Hospital in Champaign-Urbana, IL, and the School of Nutrition at Cornell University. She received a Master of Science degree in Nutrition from Oklahoma State University, a Certificate of Advanced Study at the University of Maine, and an honorary Doctor of Science degree from the University of Maine in 2006.

Katherine began teaching foods and nutrition at the University of Maine in 1969 and continued teaching FSN 101 Introduction to Food and Nutrition, her favorite course, through Continuing Education on the web many years after retirement. Her love for nutrition education energized her to conduct workshops and to present wellness programs throughout Maine and in neighboring states. She also worked at St. Joseph's Hospital and with local physicians in Bangor, helping people with medical nutrition therapy, especially related to diabetes, allergies, and weight management.

Katherine was tireless in her nutrition career. She was recognized by the University in 1976 for excellence in instruction and positive innovation in the classroom relating to individualized instruction. In 1983, she was named one of ten outstanding women of Northern and Eastern Maine, and in 1989 she was selected as one of five American Home Economic Association leaders. She was involved with the Maine State Department of Education for writing a nutrition curriculum guide for teachers in elementary schools. In the Nutrition Education and Training Program, she directed the offering of nutrition classes for 2000 teachers and school nutrition program personnel throughout the state of Maine.

She co-authored a textbook on nutrition for teachers and parents. She authored 29 articles published in professional journals as well as bulletins on Food for Children, Nutrition Games, Snacking Patterns of Adolescents, and Breast Feeding. She worked with the Maine Coalition for Food Security, the Head Start Health Advisory Committee, the Bangor Region Wellness Council, Partnership for Healthy Communities, the Society of Nutrition Education, the Maine Nutrition Council, the Maine Nutrition Network.

Katherine was a Fellow in the American Dietetic Association (she was proud of being a member for more than 70 years); she received an award for excellence in Community Dietetics in 1991; and she was president of the Maine Dietetic Association for two terms. In 1995, she received the Mary Ann Hartman Award; in 2002, she was named the Outstanding Continuing Education Faculty member in the New England Region; she was identified as the Outstanding Older Worker by Experience Works in MA in 2003; in 2011, she received both the Maine Women's Hall of Fame Award and the prestigious Medallion Award from the American Dietetic Association. …

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