OP/ED ; Doctors, Delis and Outdated Data

By Felsen, Jim | The Charleston Gazette (Charleston, WV), June 26, 2015 | Go to article overview

OP/ED ; Doctors, Delis and Outdated Data


Felsen, Jim, The Charleston Gazette (Charleston, WV)


Recently I received a prompt reply from a member of the West Virginia congressional delegation regarding my concern over the pending federal imposition of a massive increase in the volume and complexity of health data (ICD-10 implementation) required to be reported by physicians. I feared it would drive small physician practices out of business or lead to their inability to care for Medicare and Medicaid patients. The response stated the current data required was outdated. My reaction was, outdated, as decided by whom? My physician is a middle aged, personable practitioner with great medical knowledge and a keen intellect. He employs a functional EHR and manages my care through a vast network of associations with specialty physicians, health institutions and ancillary services. The exterior structure, landscaping, waiting room dcor and examination room wallpaper of my doctors office is horribly outdated. I could not care less. My care is not outdated and the current data reporting system works just fine.

I am sure the current data provided by my doctor to medical researchers, government auditors and insurance payers is considered outdated by them. Again, I could not care less unless it regards my personal medical care, although I do support medical research, quality oversight and accurate accounting. I have no problem if researchers, auditors and payers wish to provide the staff and resources to my doctor to collect additional data. Just do not burden my physician and detract from the time he spends with me and other patients.

The above scenario also caused apprehension regarding survival of the convenience store deli located in the small town five miles from my home. It is the only source of sandwiches, coffee, pizza, milk, bread, beer, bait, newspapers, toilet paper, light bulbs and hundreds of other nutritional, home and personal care items for over 10 miles. …

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