At St. Louis Shakespeare, Brains Combine with Laughter

By Newmark, Judith | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), August 5, 2015 | Go to article overview

At St. Louis Shakespeare, Brains Combine with Laughter


Newmark, Judith, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


Long associated with St. Louis Shakespeare, Suki Peters has just begun her first season the troupe's 31st as its artistic director. She directs its opening production, too: "The Further Adventures of Hedda Gabler."

Does that tell us a little something about her artistic viewpoint? Maybe. Peters directed the company's sidesplitting 2012 production of "The Compleat Wks of Willm Shksper (Abridged)." And last year, she directed its brilliant, bubbly production of "The Liar," David Ives' adaptation of a 1644 French classic.

If Peters wants to pursue this penchant for smart comedy rich in literary history, she could make plenty of St. Louis theater-goers very, very happy.

"Further Adventures" fits right into her wheelhouse. Writer Jeff Whitty (who won the Tony for "Avenue Q") makes Henrik Ibsen's cold, self-centered heroine into the centerpiece of a comedy fantasia. In Whitty's netherworld, fictional characters from various genres (theater, novels, TV, etc.) are obliged to remain until a forgetful audience releases them into oblivion.

There, Hedda (Emily Baker) and her husband, George (David Cooperstein), continue to live the life she sought to end with a gunshot, attended by the devoted Mammy (Jeanitta Perkins) from "Gone with the Wind."

Hedda can't bear it, even with the comfort of her good friend and new neighbor Medea (Lindsay Gingrich, reminding Hedda not to "talk about the children.") So, with Mammy at her side (and shlepping all the luggage), she sets off to find something new, a change that allows for a different, maybe even a happy, ending.

On their adventures, they encounter a genre-jumping cast of characters, from Little Red Riding Hood to the slithery, poetry- spouting Woman in Pink from "For Colored Girls . …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

At St. Louis Shakespeare, Brains Combine with Laughter
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.