Barack Obama Has Failed to Fail Which Is Why Obamacare and the Economy Seldom Came Up in the Gop Debate

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA), August 11, 2015 | Go to article overview

Barack Obama Has Failed to Fail Which Is Why Obamacare and the Economy Seldom Came Up in the Gop Debate


What did the men who would be president talk about during last week's prime-time Republican debate? Well, there were 19 references to God, while the economy rated only 10 mentions. Republicans in Congress have voted dozens of times to repeal all or part of Obamacare, but the candidates named President Barack Obama's signature policy nine times over the course of two hours. And energy, another erstwhile GOP favorite, came up only four times.

Strange, isn't it? The shared premise of everyone on the Republican side is that the Obama years have been a time of policy disaster on every front. Yet the candidates on that stage had almost nothing to say about any of the supposed disaster areas.

And there was a good reason they seemed so tongue-tied: Out there in the real world, none of the disasters their party predicted have actually come to pass. Mr. Obama just keeps failing to fail. And that's a big problem for the GOP - even bigger than Donald Trump.

Start with health reform. Talk to right-wingers, and they will inevitably assert that it has been a disaster. But ask exactly what form this disaster has taken, and at best you get unverified anecdotes about rate hikes and declining quality.

Meanwhile, actual numbers show that the Affordable Care Act has sharply reduced the number of uninsured Americans - especially in blue states that have been willing to expand Medicaid - while costing substantially less than expected. The newly insured are, by and large, pleased with their coverage, and the law has clearly improved access to care.

Needless to say, right-wing think tanks are still cranking out "studies" purporting to show that health reform is a failure. But it's a losing game, and judging from last week's debate Republican politicians know it.

But what about side effects? Obamacare was supposed to be a job- killer - in fact, when Marco Rubio was asked how he would boost the economy, pretty much all he had to suggest was repealing health and financial reforms. But in the year and a half since Obamacare went fully into effect, the U.S. economy has added an average of 237,000 private-sector jobs per month. That's pretty good. In fact, it's better than anything we've seen since the 1990s.

Which brings us to the economy.

There was remarkably little economic discussion at the debate, although Jeb Bush is still boasting about his record in Florida - that is, his experience in presiding over a gigantic housing bubble, and providentially leaving office before the bubble burst. …

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