Stay COOL: Keep the Country of Origin Labeling Act Intact | Commentary

By Joseph, Joel D | Roll Call, August 25, 2015 | Go to article overview

Stay COOL: Keep the Country of Origin Labeling Act Intact | Commentary


Joseph, Joel D, Roll Call


By Joel D. Joseph

Recently, the House of Representatives panicked and caved in to demands from Canada, Mexico and the World Trade Organization gutting the Country of Origin Labeling Act. These are the same members of Congress who want President Barack Obama to "get tough" with Iran and Russia, yet cower when threatened by third-rate powers.

California has a population greater than Canada. Mexico is a drug cartel operating as a country. Every day we allow substandard Mexican delivery trucks to cross our borders and enter into the United States. With regard to our northern neighbor, we have not complained that Canada has imposed confiscatory duties on American dairy products and chicken.

We need to get tough; we should take the gloves off and fight Canada and Mexico on unfair trade. We should also expose the World Trade Organization for what it is: an undemocratic, unfair clique of small countries that love to skewer the United States.

Canada and Mexico filed a complaint with the WTO charging that COOL was a barrier to free trade because it required grocery stores to label meat products with their country of origin. Ninety percent of American consumers want to have the country of origin labels on their meats. If mad cow disease is coming from Canada (which it has), consumers and processors should have the right to know where their beef is coming from.

But what about the real tariff barriers to trade enacted by our northern neighbor? According to Canada's leading newspaper, the Globe and Mail, the Canadian federal government imposes tariffs that run between 200 per cent and 300 per cent on virtually all dairy and chicken imports including milk, cheese and ice cream. Incredibly, we can't ship Vermont's Ben & Jerry's ice cream or Vermont's excellent cheddar cheese, milk or butter across the border because it would triple the cost.

Instead of enacting excessive duties, Mexico has established illegal subsidies on many products. Two major industries affected by this are sugar and steel. The U.S. International Trade Commission recently made a determination (by a 5-0 vote) that imports of dumped and subsidized Mexican sugar are materially injuring U. …

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Stay COOL: Keep the Country of Origin Labeling Act Intact | Commentary
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