Baseball Author to Speak

The Topeka Capital-Journal, September 8, 2015 | Go to article overview

Baseball Author to Speak


The impulse to research Negro Leagues baseball is rooted in Topeka for one of the game's foremost historians.

Consequently, when Phil Dixon set out to tour 90 cities with his presentation, "The Kansas City Monarchs in Our Hometown,'' he made sure Topeka was prominent on the list.

The number 90 was derived a year ago to commemorate the 90th anniversary of the Monarchs' triumph in the first Negro League World Series. And guess what? Topeka will be the 90th stop on Dixon's tour, though he has extended his discussions to include 10 more communities.

His Topeka appearance, which is free to the public, is scheduled at 7 p.m. Thursday at the Bettis Family Sports Complex and is co- sponsored by the Shawnee County Historical Society and the Shawnee County Baseball Hall of Fame.

For Dixon, a native of Kansas City, Kan., the visit will serve as a reminder of the six months he lived in Topeka while working for Duckwall-Alco Stores in 1980.

One day Dixon was looking at items at Packrat Antiques on S.W. 6th Street. A picture of an old baseball team caught his eye. It impressed Dixon enough to shell out $75.

When he showed the picture to the owner of a Topeka nightclub where Dixon occasionally played the trumpet, he was told of a former Negro Leagues player from Topeka he might be interested in meeting.

That player was Dink Mothell.

"He wasn't the first Negro Leagues player I ever met,'' said Dixon, "but he really gave me the inspiration to begin my research.''

The two spoke a few times -- detailed discussions that provided Dixon insight into the Negro Leagues. Mothell, a native Topekan, related stories from his 15 seasons, where he caught some of the game's all-time greats, such as Bullet Rogan. Mothell was versatile, too, playing all positions, including first base for the Monarchs' 1924 championship team.

Woven into Mothell's recollections was a genuine appreciation of the game, which fascinated Dixon.

"He talked to me about baseball in ways I'd never heard,'' Dixon said. "Dink was kind of reaching forward, when I was reaching back.''

Incredibly, Phil Dixon, his wife Kerry, and Dink Mothell all shared the same birthday, Aug. 13. Two weeks after Dixon left Topeka and returned to work in Kansas City, Mothell died. Yet the stories he shared as one of the Negro League's great pioneer players, planted a seed.

Enough that today, Dixon's work totals nine baseball books, including biographies of Rogan and Buck O'Neil. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Baseball Author to Speak
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.