W.Va. Senators: Climate Remarks Won't Have Effect

By Gutman, David | Charleston Gazette Mail, September 24, 2015 | Go to article overview

W.Va. Senators: Climate Remarks Won't Have Effect


Gutman, David, Charleston Gazette Mail


As Pope Francis prepares for a historic address to Congress, West Virginia's senators are excited to hear from him, hoping for a spiritual, uplifting message, but say his push for global action on climate change won't change much in Washington. Francis has made fighting climate change one of his top priorities, saying that its effects will be felt most profoundly by the world's poor.

His recent encyclical, a papal letter, calls for the progressive phasing out of fossil fuels "without delay and the development of renewable energy.

He repeated that call during his first public remarks in the United States, at the White House on Wednesday.

"Climate change is a problem which can no longer be left to a future generation, Francis said. "When it comes to the care of our common home,' we are living at a critical moment in history.

Will Francis' emphasis on global warming change any minds during his address to a joint session of Congress - the first by a pope - this morning?

"I'm sure he'll be talking about that, said Sen. Joe Manchin, D- W.Va. "No one should take any offense to it. Will it change anything? Absolutely not. I don't think it changes anybody's direction on what it is that needs to be done.

Sen. Shelley Moore Capito, R-W.Va., agreed.

"He's one of many voices on things of that nature, she said of the Pope. "I don't expect that he'll have a big impact on what direction we're going, one way or another, at this particular time, no.

"I'm sure there's things he's going to say that I won't agree with, but I'm certainly going to be listening and respectful.

With her ARENA Act, Capito has led the Republican fight in the Senate to stop President Obama's efforts on climate change. Manchin is the sole Democratic co-sponsor of that bill. Much of the national Republican Party rejects climate science and has no plans to act on climate change.

Both West Virginia senators said they were looking forward to hearing Francis' thoughts on how a powerful nation can help the less fortunate.

"How we can be leaders in helping the less powerful, whether it's poverty or health care or forgiveness or other things, Capito said. "He'd frame it, I'm sure, in terms of the teachings of the Bible.

Manchin, a Catholic, said he was hoping for and expecting a very spiritual message.

"Of the kindness that we all should have for humanity, no matter where you come from or what rung of life you're on, he said. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

W.Va. Senators: Climate Remarks Won't Have Effect
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.