Toll in Afghan Hospital Strike Might Rise ; Doctors without Borders Says 24 Staff Members Missing and Feared Dead

By Nordland, Rod | International New York Times, October 9, 2015 | Go to article overview

Toll in Afghan Hospital Strike Might Rise ; Doctors without Borders Says 24 Staff Members Missing and Feared Dead


Nordland, Rod, International New York Times


Doctors Without Borders said 24 staff members were still missing, with many of them feared to be dead, after an U.S. attack in Kunduz on Oct. 3.

The death toll may increase significantly from an airstrike that devastated the Doctors Without Borders hospital in Kunduz, Afghanistan, officials from the organization said on Thursday, as the search continued for 24 staff members, many of them feared to be dead.

The deaths of 12 hospital staff members and 10 patients have been confirmed in the American airstrike, with 37 people wounded. Five days after the Oct. 3 attack, Doctors Without Borders has still been unable to find the 24 staff members, despite having a hotline for them to call.

"We are worried," said Guilhem Molinie, the group's country representative in Afghanistan. "We haven't stopped looking for them, and we're not the only ones. Their families want to know where they are, too. We fear that some of them may be dead."

Mr. Molinie said that there might still be more bodies in the heavily damaged main building of the hospital, but that the group had not been able to return to inspect it because of security concerns.

New details of the attack emerged on Thursday at a news conference the organization held in Kabul, the capital, as its officials repeated their call for an independent, international investigation.

The American warplane that attacked the hospital, believed to be an AC-130 gunship supporting American Special Operations or Special Forces troops, made five bombing runs, spaced about 15 minutes apart, beginning at 2:08 a.m. on Saturday, Doctors Without Borders officials said, and the attack continued for an hour and 15 minutes.

Earlier reports from the group had said the bombing went on for 30 minutes, but the officials said the half-hour referred to the time the bombing continued after Doctors Without Borders had reached Americans in Kabul and Washington to tell them the hospital was under aerial attack.

Each of the five air attacks, described as strafing runs -- with the aircraft firing rapidly with munitions that caused explosions inside the building -- specifically targeted the main hospital building, which housed the emergency room, intensive care unit, blood lab and X-ray area, the group said.

"It was hit with precision repeatedly while surrounding buildings were left untouched," Mr. Molinie said.

Most of the victims were in the emergency room, intensive care unit and blood lab. Patients in nearby wards, some of them no more than 10 yards from the main building, were untouched, according to Doctors Without Borders.

There was no active ground combat in the vicinity of the hospital at the time of the attack, as far as officials inside the hospital could tell, Mr. Molinie said. He described the Friday afternoon and evening before the attack as unusually quiet compared with previous days of fighting since the Taliban captured Kunduz on Sept. 28.

Ambulances were able to bring civilian victims to the hospital that day, including a family of five, hit in their car as they tried to flee the city. Three young children from that family were killed in the airstrike, Doctors Without Borders officials said.

Both Taliban and government fighters were being treated in the hospital -- a fully equipped trauma center specializing in war wounds, with 150 beds and a staff of more than 400 that included expatriates and Afghans -- but Doctors Without Borders officials insisted that there had been no weapons or explosives anywhere inside the hospital compound, in line with its longstanding policy. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Toll in Afghan Hospital Strike Might Rise ; Doctors without Borders Says 24 Staff Members Missing and Feared Dead
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.