Prudhomme's Secret: Bronze, Don't Blacken, the Chicken Breasts; the Great New Orleans Chef, Paul Prudhomme, Considered the Father of Blackened Redfish, Died Last Month at Age 75. He Gave Me This Tip, "My Advice to People at Home Is Bronzing Rather Than Blackening. This Avoids the Smoke and the Risk of Handling a Red-Hot Skillet While Still Achieving an Excellent Result." [Derived Headline]

By Gassenheimer, Linda | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, November 3, 2015 | Go to article overview

Prudhomme's Secret: Bronze, Don't Blacken, the Chicken Breasts; the Great New Orleans Chef, Paul Prudhomme, Considered the Father of Blackened Redfish, Died Last Month at Age 75. He Gave Me This Tip, "My Advice to People at Home Is Bronzing Rather Than Blackening. This Avoids the Smoke and the Risk of Handling a Red-Hot Skillet While Still Achieving an Excellent Result." [Derived Headline]


Gassenheimer, Linda, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


The great New Orleans chef, Paul Prudhomme, considered the father of blackened redfish, died last month at age 75. He gave me this tip, "My advice to people at home is bronzing rather than blackening. This avoids the smoke and the risk of handling a red- hot skillet while still achieving an excellent result."

The coat of this bronzed chicken breast is golden and caramelized from the cooking method. The secret to bronzing is to keep the skillet at the right temperature. The chicken should take 6 to 7 minutes to cook. If it takes much longer, the skillet is not hot enough.

From "Mix 'n' Match Meals in Minutes for People with Diabetes" by Linda Gassen-heimer, published by the American Diabetes Association. Gassenheimer is a food writer for the Miami Herald. Write to her in care of Living, Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, D.L. Clark Building, 503 Martindale St., Pittsburgh, PA, 15212, or email tribliving@tribweb.com.

Bronzed Chicken Breasts

Cajun spice mixes can be found in the spice section of the supermarket; boneless, skinless chicken breast cutlets, about 1/2- inch thick can be found in the meat section.

Regular boneless skinless chicken breasts can be used instead.

Pound the chicken breasts flat to about 1/2- to 3/4-inch thick using a meat bat or heavy skillet. An electric frying pan can be used instead of a skillet. Keep the temperature at 350 degrees.

2 tablespoons Cajun or blackened spice seasoning mix

1 tablespoon flour

3/4 pound boneless, skinless chicken breast cutlets

2 teaspoons canola oil

Mix together the Cajun or blackened seasoning and flour. …

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Prudhomme's Secret: Bronze, Don't Blacken, the Chicken Breasts; the Great New Orleans Chef, Paul Prudhomme, Considered the Father of Blackened Redfish, Died Last Month at Age 75. He Gave Me This Tip, "My Advice to People at Home Is Bronzing Rather Than Blackening. This Avoids the Smoke and the Risk of Handling a Red-Hot Skillet While Still Achieving an Excellent Result." [Derived Headline]
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