Dwight-Englewood Mourns the Loss of Jerald Krauthamer

By Levin, Jay | The Record (Bergen County, NJ), November 11, 2015 | Go to article overview

Dwight-Englewood Mourns the Loss of Jerald Krauthamer


Levin, Jay, The Record (Bergen County, NJ)


In the halls and on the fields of Dwight-Englewood School, Jerald Krauthamer was "Kraut," the rare teacher and coach who answered to an unmistakable, affectionate nickname.

Mr. Krauthamer? Coach Krauthamer? That must be some other guy.

Kraut, who died of cancer Nov. 3 at age 65, taught English in Dwight-Englewood's Upper School for 38 years. For much of that tenure he also coached boys and girls in cross-country and track and field, racking up league, county and state championships.

The lanky, balding, Jersey City-born educator, who favored bucket hats and baseball caps, won every major faculty award that the private school in Englewood confers and was inducted into its Athletic Hall of Fame. More important, he won the love and respect of students.

"Kraut had this way of caring," said Julia McSpirit Beckett, a junior who competed in cross-country and track and took freshman English with him.

"I was never really fast, but Kraut didn't care. You wanted to do good for him not because you felt he would get upset if you didn't, but you wanted to make him proud."

Kraut invested time and personal resources in his students. When runners hit the suburban streets to train, even on weekends, the coach trailed them in his Ford Taurus so he could hand out bottled water and energy bars. He bought his runners neon-green caps. Lunchtime would find Kraut among the students in the cafeteria, all the better to offer them writing tips in a relaxed setting.

"He was our dad," said Tara Satnick, a senior.

And Kraut, who didn't have children of his own, considered his students his kids.

He even sang to them: "Everything is singular ... in its own way," to the tune of the 1970 hit, "Everything Is Beautiful" -- a melodic way to drive home a linguistic point in class.

Young Park, who graduated from Dwight-Englewood in 1990 and still holds the girls record for shot put and discus throwing, said she owes her status as an elite athlete to Kraut. …

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