Subleases Lift Two Warren Place Occupancy to 99 Percent

By Davis, KirLee | THE JOURNAL RECORD, November 13, 2015 | Go to article overview

Subleases Lift Two Warren Place Occupancy to 99 Percent


Davis, KirLee, THE JOURNAL RECORD


TULSA - Four filled subleases have lifted Tulsa's Two Warren Place office building occupancy to 99 percent, according to McKoy Co. leasing broker Kelly McKoy.

"It's amazing to pull that off in a 500,000-square-foot building," said Patrick Coates, the head of Tulsa's Coates Commercial Properties.

New tenants have occupied 23,000 square feet of emptied space on Two Warren Place's third floor, 15,000 on the 12th floor, 26,700 on the 13th, and 8,000 on the 14th, said Jared Andresen, president of Commercial Oklahoma/Cushman and Wakefield.

One of these moves involved expansion by the real estate brokerage Stan Johnson, an existing Two Warren Place tenant, said Andresen, whose firm participated in the leasing talks. The other subleases introduced new tenants to the 19-story tower.

These actions leave this 489,870-square-foot building with few options for new tenants, said McKoy. That differs from the other side of that mixed-use parkway, where the 470,025-square-foot One Warren Place tower stands just 75-percent occupied.

McKoy is trying to fill 21,404 square feet of truly vacant space on the second floor of the 32-year-old One Warren Place. He also has 19,950 square feet available on the third floor, 23,294 on the fourth, 19,735 on the 18th, and 23,807 on the 19th.

That building also contains at least 72,000 square feet of available sublease space, said Andresen.

Such shadow space may explain the difference between the two Warren Place towers, both owned by Rosemont Realty. Since sublease contracts fill vacated space that remains under lease to its original tenant, brokers may offer rates that undercut what McKoy lists on Rosemont's unleased space. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Subleases Lift Two Warren Place Occupancy to 99 Percent
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.