Disneyland, SoCal Theme Parks Boost Security after San Bernardino Terrorist Attack

By Yarbrough, Beau | Pasadena Star-News, December 19, 2015 | Go to article overview

Disneyland, SoCal Theme Parks Boost Security after San Bernardino Terrorist Attack


Yarbrough, Beau, Pasadena Star-News


In an attempt to keep it the Happiest Place on Earth, the Walt Disney Co. has stepped up security at its theme parks in California and Florida.

"We continually review our comprehensive approach to security and are implementing additional security measures, as appropriate," said Suzi Brown, spokeswoman for Disneyland Resorts.

The most visible security upgrade implemented Thursday are walk- through metal detectors, similar to the ones seen at professional sporting events. After park guests pass through the bag checks that were added to park security after the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, randomly selected patrons will be directed through the metal detectors.

The Walt Disney Co. has also discontinued the sale of toy guns at its theme parks, stores and restaurants.

The parks' costume policy has been updated, and toy and costume guns, whether realistic or "fantasy," are banned from the park. Guests 14 years and older are no longer allowed to wear costumes or masks into the park. (Brown said the costume and masks policy may be revisited closer to Halloween, which has been an increasingly important holiday at Disneyland in recent years.)

Shortly after the Dec. 2 terrorist attack in San Bernardino, Disneyland also increased the presence of armed police officers and bomb-sniffing dogs at the park.

Disneyland isn't alone in revisiting its security measures after the attack on the Inland Regional Center:

"We have begun testing metal detection at our theme park," a written statement released by Universal Studios Hollywood on Thursday reads in part. …

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