Book Reviews

The Topeka Capital-Journal, December 20, 2015 | Go to article overview

Book Reviews


Everyone loves a good mystery, and these mystery books for third- through sixth-grade readers will spark the imagination and inspire curiosity.

"Theodore Boone: The Fugitive" by John Grisham, 2015, Dutton Children's Books, 250 pages, ages 9-13.

John Grisham, author of 27 novels, has written five books for young readers, featuring Theodore Boone, an eighth-grader with a nose for mysteries and an eye for criminals. In "The Fugitive," kid- lawyer Theo spies a dangerous accused murder on the subway in Washington, D.C., while on a school trip. With the help of his almost-law-abiding uncle, the two hatch a plan to bring the criminal to justice.

"The Misadventures of Edgar & Allan Poe: The Pet and the Pendulum" by Gordon McAlpine, illustrated by Sam Zuppardi, 2015, 196 pages, ages 8-11.

Twins Edgar and Allen Poe, great, great, great, great, great nephews of the legendary Edgar Allen Poe, have a knack for falling into trouble and outwitting harm. In this third book of the Misadventure series, the boys are unknowingly caught up in a deranged professor's plot. It will take all of their cleverness and cunning -- and a little help from their uncle in the Great Beyond -- to foil this caper.

"Unstoppable Octobia May" by Sharon G. Flake, 2014, Scholastic, 276 pages, ages 8-12.

Curiosity leads a young girl, Octobia May, on a hunt to determine the secrets of her aunt's boarder, Mr. Davenport. His incessant daytime typing, secret meetings with men in dark coats and late- night prowling are all suspicious. Is Mr. Davenport really a World War II hero, or is he fooling her aunt, the other boarders and the town? Octobia May can't stop asking questions and seeking answers, even when others call her a troublemaker and tell her to mind her place. With the help of her best friend, Jonah, the truth is discovered, and it's a surprise to all, except Octobia May. …

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