Football & Politics; Whether Life Imitates Sports or Vice Versa, Last Week's Playoff Game between the Pittsburgh Steelers and the Cincinnati Bengals Showed That Presidential Politics and Professional Football Are on the Same Track. [Derived Headline]

By Mistick, Joseph Sabino | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, January 16, 2016 | Go to article overview

Football & Politics; Whether Life Imitates Sports or Vice Versa, Last Week's Playoff Game between the Pittsburgh Steelers and the Cincinnati Bengals Showed That Presidential Politics and Professional Football Are on the Same Track. [Derived Headline]


Mistick, Joseph Sabino, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


Whether life imitates sports or vice versa, last week's playoff game between the Pittsburgh Steelers and the Cincinnati Bengals showed that presidential politics and professional football are on the same track.

The "win at any cost" approach dominated the arena, as the traditional rules of engagement were quickly rejected. Some participants seemed hellbent on inflicting disabling injuries on their opponents. And an "in your face" attitude prevailed, as mean- spirited personal exchanges became the norm and fair play went out the window.

The football game was pretty rough, too. Some Pittsburgh fans who were in the Cincinnati stadium said they feared a mob of Bengals fans could riot at any moment or turn its anger toward innocent bystanders. The hometown crowd cheered when Steelers players were injured.

The mood was not much different than what has been seen at some Donald Trump rallies, where anyone who opposes the Republican front- runner gets treated in the same way. At a rally in South Carolina, a Muslim woman and a Jewish man were ejected for embracing the great American tradition of peaceful political protest.

Rose Hamid wore a hijab and a T-shirt that said, "Salam, I come in peace." As Trump stepped-up his anti-Muslim rhetoric, Hamid and Marty Rosenbluth stood-up and put on yellow star patches with the word "Muslim" in the center. For that, they were targeted and led away as the crowd turned ugly, cheering and taunting them.

Trump is the best example of the worst behavior in American politics. But across the board, too many candidates no longer are satisfied to win an election -- they now try to destroy each other. …

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Football & Politics; Whether Life Imitates Sports or Vice Versa, Last Week's Playoff Game between the Pittsburgh Steelers and the Cincinnati Bengals Showed That Presidential Politics and Professional Football Are on the Same Track. [Derived Headline]
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