2 DEP Staffers Violate Policy; Two Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection Employees Drove State-Owned Vehicles Even Though They Lacked Valid Licenses, Apparently Violating State Law and Government Policy. [Derived Headline]

By Daniels, Melissa | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, January 18, 2016 | Go to article overview

2 DEP Staffers Violate Policy; Two Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection Employees Drove State-Owned Vehicles Even Though They Lacked Valid Licenses, Apparently Violating State Law and Government Policy. [Derived Headline]


Daniels, Melissa, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


Two Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection employees drove state-owned vehicles even though they lacked valid licenses, apparently violating state law and government policy.

The drivers, whose names were not released, gained access to state cars and drove them despite having suspended or revoked licenses. Their infractions were identified during a routine Office of Inspector General review of state vehicle usage from 2010 to 2014.

No policies will change as a result of the findings, at least for now. The report didn't reveal a systemic problem, said Jeffrey Sheridan, spokesman for Gov. Tom Wolf.

The inspector general's review included about 1,000 employees across four agencies.

"We are always open to improving processes where warranted, but this report e_SEmD posted online by the Wolf administration in an effort to improve transparency e_SEmD was conducted under a previous administration and did not show a widespread problem," Sheridan told the Tribune-Review.

"Agencies will continue to enforce their policies and procedures to ensure individuals operating state vehicles have valid licenses," he said.

It's unclear whether the employees drove state vehicles that had been assigned to them, or whether they signed out cars on a temporary basis.

A DEP spokesman confirmed that the employees work for the agency but would not say whether either was disciplined, citing personnel issues.

Driving without a valid license in Pennsylvania is punishable with a $200 fine, according to state law, and could result in further suspensions or revocations.

Supervisors are supposed to check employees' licenses annually, DEP spokesman Neil Shrader said.

The inspector general's office would not comment on how the employees lost valid license status or any disciplinary action. …

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