Appearance a Chance to Pick 'Walking Dead' Artist's Brain; the Idea That Tony Moore and Friend Robert Kirkman Had for a Comic Book Turned out to Be One of the Best That Anybody Has Had in a Long Time. [Derived Headline]

By Machosky, Michael | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, January 30, 2016 | Go to article overview

Appearance a Chance to Pick 'Walking Dead' Artist's Brain; the Idea That Tony Moore and Friend Robert Kirkman Had for a Comic Book Turned out to Be One of the Best That Anybody Has Had in a Long Time. [Derived Headline]


Machosky, Michael, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


The idea that Tony Moore and friend Robert Kirkman had for a comic book turned out to be one of the best that anybody has had in a long time.

Maybe you've heard of it.

Moore illustrated the first comics in a series called "The Walking Dead" (Image Comics, 2003) that were (and still are) written by Kirkman, who's also writer and producer for the popular AMC series based on the comics. Moore stopped doing the interior art after issue No. 6 but kept making the covers until issue No. 24, as well as the covers for the first four collected volumes. Since then, he's worked on major titles such as "Venom," "Ghost Riders," "Punisher" and "Deadpool."

He'll be at New Dimension Comics at Pittsburgh Mills on Feb. 1 to autograph and sell his work -- and to highlight "The Walking Dead" No. 150.

"Kirkman and I had known each other since we were kids," Moore says. "We met in seventh-grade history class and went all through school together. I moved to Cincinnati to go to art school, and he went to Lexington (Ky.) to get a job. He contacted me freshman year to put together some comics. We ended up putting together a little publishing company: Funk-o-tron. Our flagship comic was called 'Battle Pope.e_SSRq "

Yes, "Battle Pope" is pretty much what the title says. If anything, it's early evidence of a the Kirkman/Moore duo's humor and willingness to mess with the established formats and conventions. Then they took on horror.

"When we were kids, we watched a lot of stuff together," Moore recalls. "When we were working on books, we'd take a break for lunch or dinner and watch movies. A lot of time, they were horror movies, zombie movies. Over the course of working together, I'd say we watched every horror movie that had ever been created. We thought it would be cool to make a book that was like that."

"The Walking Dead" started with a Georgia cop waking up from a coma, to find his world destroyed, his family missing and "walkers" wandering the streets looking for the last remnants of humanity to eat. It paid homage to the classic (Pittsburgh-shot) George Romero zombie universe, while emphasizing the complicated relations between survivors, after society had totally collapsed. Plus, it was really gory and bloody -- every monster-cartoon-drawing kid's dream.

"It stays evergreen," Moore says of the zombie idea. "It's unromantic. It's brutal. It's very much about survival. Americans, in particular, have this romantic fascination with the Wild West and survival. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Appearance a Chance to Pick 'Walking Dead' Artist's Brain; the Idea That Tony Moore and Friend Robert Kirkman Had for a Comic Book Turned out to Be One of the Best That Anybody Has Had in a Long Time. [Derived Headline]
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.