Panel Tackles Mental Health in Workplace, School

By Nuzum, Lydia | Charleston Gazette Mail, February 19, 2016 | Go to article overview

Panel Tackles Mental Health in Workplace, School


Nuzum, Lydia, Charleston Gazette Mail


When it comes to advocating for mental health services, Terri McCormick is more than a business professional - she is a woman who has seen the impact of that work firsthand. McCormick, the human resources director for BrickStreet Mutual Insurance Company, was one of four panelists at a Thursday luncheon geared toward exploring the evolution of workplace wellness and mental health. McCormick was the last to speak, but before she could talk about her work, she had to talk about her life - two things that cannot be viewed separately when it comes to wellness.

"I'm sitting here having an emotional response to what I'm hearing, because several years ago, a social worker and a policeman went into my daughter's home and removed our four grandchildren and gave them to us, McCormick said. "Sitting here as a user of the services they're describing ... all of them are things my family is a poster child for. It's something I never thought I'd experience in my life.

The Elevations Professional Women's Network, a 1,700-member group supported by the Charleston Area Alliance and Dow Chemical, held a "Women in Health lunch and discussion downtown Thursday moderated by Cynthia Persily, president and CEO of Highland Hospital Association, and featuring local women involved in different aspects of mental health treatment and wellness promotion.

Dr. Jenee Walker, a Charleston psychiatrist and panelist, said the prevalence of mental illness coupled with the stigma often associated with it makes it a hot-button issue for employers, schools and families alike. According to Walker, nearly 1 in 5 people will be diagnosed with some sort of mental illness in their lifetime, while as many as 3 in 5 have some sort of symptom of mental illness but may not seek treatment.

"Often people want to ignore it, but that's not healthy, Walker said. "Just listen, and let them know that you care, and direct them to your [human resources] department or to someone who can get them connected with the services they need. Be aware, be compassionate, and take steps to get them help.

Nearly two-thirds of those who need help don't seek it, Persily said - likely for fear of judgment. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Panel Tackles Mental Health in Workplace, School
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.