Slogans, Traps Big Part of AZ Zika Plan Arizona Weapons against Zika -- Traps and Slogans ; Pima County Specialists Look for Mosquitoes That Spread It

By Beal, Tom | AZ Daily Star, March 13, 2016 | Go to article overview

Slogans, Traps Big Part of AZ Zika Plan Arizona Weapons against Zika -- Traps and Slogans ; Pima County Specialists Look for Mosquitoes That Spread It


Beal, Tom, AZ Daily Star


The Zika virus may come to Arizona, but -- if the past predicts the future -- it may not spread.

Arizona, particularly its warmer urban areas around Phoenix, Tucson and Yuma, grow healthy populations of the Aedes aegypti mosquito every summer. That tiny, ankle-biting mosquito can spread the viruses of yellow fever, dengue fever, Chikungunya -- and now, Zika.

Arizona has had travel-related cases of dengue and Chikungunya, but those have not caused outbreaks here as they did in Mexico in recent years.

"Something," probably a combination of lifestyle and climate, is keeping those diseases at bay, said epidemiologist Heidi Brown.

"Whatever was keeping them from transmitting dengue, whatever kept them from transmitting Chikungunya, is the same thing that is probably keeping them from transmitting Zika," said Brown, of the University of Arizona's Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health.

Brown is spending her research time these days "trying to tease apart" what those conditions are. And while she is reassured by "the science and the history" of Aedes-borne diseases in Arizona, she is reluctant to provide absolute assurance about the scariest aspects of Zika -- its suspected ability to cause serious birth defects.

"I recently had a talk with a woman who is currently pregnant. My kid is only 2 years old, and it gives me a hugely different perspective on it. The science is telling us -- and even the experience is telling us -- the probability of Zika coming to Arizona is really very low.

"If I were a pregnant woman, I would try my best to be reassured by the science and the history, and then I'd do the kinds of things I can control around my house with respect to Aedes aegypti."

Fight the bite!

Zika won't appear in Arizona unless it is brought here by someone who travels to an area with outbreaks. That person would then have to be bitten by a mosquito and that mosquito would have to bite an uninfected person to begin the spread.

That's why medical reporting is so critical, said Jessica Rigler, chief of the Bureau of Epidemiology and Disease Control at the state Department of Health Services.

State and county health officials will respond quickly to ensure that infected person's environment is as mosquito-free as possible and that he or she is taking the proper precautions against being bitten.

Until that happens, Arizona health officials plan to fend off the Zika virus with surveillance and public education -- basically, doctor's reports, mosquito traps and slogans.

The traps won't eliminate mosquitoes that carry the virus, but they will give health authorities a good map of where the mosquitoes are abundant.

The slogans -- including the overarching "Fight the Bite! Day and Night" -- are part of an education campaign that urges people to avoid bites by covering up, using repellent and policing their yards for breeding areas.

Those steps, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, are the most effective ways to prevent the virus' spread.

If an outbreak does occur, other measures can be taken -- spraying pesticides to kill adult mosquitoes, using larvicides in standing bodies of water, isolating hot zones where people are being infected.

Spread occurs when a mosquito bites a person with the virus and then bites an uninfected person, after the virus has had a chance to work its way from the mosquito's gut to its salivary glands.

If you protect yourself from being bitten, you can neither contract nor spread the virus.

If you routinely police your yard for sources of water in which the mosquitoes might breed, you can make that task easier and your life more pleasant. The Aedes mosquitoes don't fly far after hatching -- as little as 50 to 100 feet on average. If you are being bitten, they are breeding at your house or a close neighbor's.

mosquito found here

We won't know ahead of time that Zika-infected mosquitoes are here, because vector-control officials don't test for that. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Slogans, Traps Big Part of AZ Zika Plan Arizona Weapons against Zika -- Traps and Slogans ; Pima County Specialists Look for Mosquitoes That Spread It
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.