2 Directors Are to Be Replaced at Twitter

By Isaac, Mike | International New York Times, April 11, 2016 | Go to article overview

2 Directors Are to Be Replaced at Twitter


Isaac, Mike, International New York Times


Twitter is adding an executive from PepsiCo and an Internet entrepreneur as it faces pressure to remake its board.

Jack Dorsey has shaken up Twitter's social media service, executive ranks and board of directors since he returned as chief executive of the company last year.

On Friday, Mr. Dorsey took his latest steps to make over Twitter, using new appointments and departures to the board.

In a filing, Twitter said two longtime directors, Peter Currie and Peter Chernin, were not considered for re-election this year at their request. They will be succeeded by Hugh Johnston, who is vice chairman and chief financial officer of PepsiCo, and Martha Lane Fox, a British entrepreneur who has run Internet businesses and who has been a prolific user of Twitter. Twitter's board will number eight people after the departures of Mr. Currie and Mr. Chernin.

Twitter has long faced pressure to add more diversity to its board, which has largely been composed of white men. After the criticism, Twitter added Marjorie Scardino, the company's first female director, a publishing industry executive. Omid Kordestani, a former Google executive who as an Iranian-American brought the perspective of an immigrant and ethnic minority, joined Twitter's board last year.

In a tweet, Mr. Kordestani, who is Twitter's executive chairman, hinted there were more board changes to come.

"The entire board is working to bring greater diversity to our ranks," he wrote. "Watch this space."

Mr. Dorsey was more specific, noting the company would continue to bring on new directors, "ones that will bring diversity and represent the strong communities on Twitter," he wrote. "This matters & is a must. …

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