FIX-IT MAN FOR ATHLETES P.Z. Pearce Puts Medical into Sports Medicine

By Guilfoil, Michael | The Spokesman-Review (Spokane, WA), April 10, 2016 | Go to article overview

FIX-IT MAN FOR ATHLETES P.Z. Pearce Puts Medical into Sports Medicine


Guilfoil, Michael, The Spokesman-Review (Spokane, WA)


FRONT AND CENTER

How's this for an "Aha!" moment?

Patrick Zim Pearce - aka "P.Z." - a self-described mediocre high school student, was attending the University of Hawaii when, one day while enjoying a Primo beer on his lanai, he had an epiphany:

"I should attend medical school," he thought.

And he was right.

Since graduating from the University of Washington School of Medicine, Pearce has worked with the Seattle Seahawks, Spokane Chiefs and Olympic athletes, served as Bloomsday's medical director and as assistant medical director of the Hawaii Ironman Triathlon World Championship.

In addition to founding Champions Sports Medicine in Spokane, he is a UW associate professor for clinical medicine and national medical director for the Rock 'N' Roll Marathon Series.

During a recent interview, Pearce discussed mentors, answering machines and how to approach Bloomsday.

S-R: Where did you grow up?

Pearce: Really all over the place, but I consider Seattle my home.

S-R: What were your interests back then?

Pearce: Mechanical stuff. I destroyed virtually everything in our house taking it apart to figure out how it worked.

S-R: Did you have a favorite high-school class?

Pearce: Not really. I spent some of my childhood in England, where schools are very difficult. When I came back to the states in fifth grade, I was functioning at the high-school level. So I basically coasted through the rest of school, did very poorly and almost flunked out. They said I should be a welder or go into agriculture.

S-R: Did you participate in high school sports?

Pearce: I played soccer, and went on to play for the University of Hawaii and one year professionally for the Seattle Sounders in the old North American Soccer League.

S-R: What did you study at the University of Hawaii?

Pearce: Oceanography. But I had been a firefighter and paramedic in Seattle prior to that, and one day during my senior year, while drinking a beer, I thought, "I should go to medical school." So I got on my bike and rode up to the campus, because there was no internet, got the catalog out and realized I had all the prerequisites. I just had to take a test. I took the test and didn't get in the first time, which is very common. Then I moved back to Seattle and took another year at the University of Washington, earned a second degree and passed the test.

S-R: What was your specialty?

Pearce: I did my residency in family practice, but I've always been interested in sports. While I was in medical school, I worked with the team physician for both the Sounders and the SuperSonics, and knew that's what I wanted to do.

S-R: What brought you to Spokane?

Pearce: I came here for my residency with the attitude, "I can do anything for a couple of years," and fell in love with the place.

S-R: Why did you start Champions Sports Medicine?

Pearce: I really wanted to do a full-service sports medicine clinic, including chiropractic and physical therapy, massage therapy and a training area. This is the eighth iteration of the idea.

S-R: Medicine and business demand different skills. How did you acquire the expertise to run a business?

Pearce: I paid a lot of fines and late fees, and learned through experience.

S-R: How does one go about building a sports medicine practice?

Pearce: Because I was the team doc for the Indians and worked with the Seahawks, baseball and football players come and see me. And since I take care of the Chiefs, I see a lot of skaters.

S-R: Did you continue competing in sports after launching your medical practice?

Pearce: Yes. I've done nine Ironmans (consisting of a 2.4-mile swim, 112-mile bicycle ride and 26. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

FIX-IT MAN FOR ATHLETES P.Z. Pearce Puts Medical into Sports Medicine
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.