What Would Happen If We Revised the Bible?

Wyoming Tribune-Eagle (Cheyenne, WY), May 16, 2016 | Go to article overview

What Would Happen If We Revised the Bible?


The current debate about which bathrooms transgender folks may use is the last straw. The time has come. The Christian canon, or Bible, must be revised. "Canon" derives from a Greek word referring to a standard of measurement. Religious canons are standards against which people measure their faith, writings believed authoritative within that faith. For 2,000 years, the Christian authoritative writings have included the New Testament. But that canon has apparently proved too difficult to understand for many Christians. There's a part of "love your neighbor" they've not been able to grasp. "Judge not, lest you be judged," confounds people accustomed to helping God with quality control.

Some employ the Christian canon as a weapon, beating others over the head with it, quoting it to support notions and prejudices about women, the poor, persons of other faiths, racial minorities, gays, lesbians and transgender people. The New Testament must simply not be clear enough. Jesus' message about turning the other cheek and doing unto others as you would have them do unto you has been lost on too many Christians. For some, the Bible has become a graven image of God, an idol. Jesus said, "Love your neighbor as yourself" and then departed. Some tired of waiting for his return. If he isn't coming back, they feel the need to judge others in his stead. As the children of Israel crafted a golden calf when they tired of waiting for Moses, these Christians have their own idol.

Jesus said you couldn't serve two masters. You cannot serve God and the Bible simultaneously. You'll be, as Matthew 6:24 says, "devoted to the one and despise the other." If you use the Bible to justify marginalizing some of God's children, you've chosen the Book of God over the God of the Book.

There were ancient believers who thought it a mistake to reduce the rich oral history of the faith to writing. They argued that once you write about God, you are making God in your own image. They thought it was supposed to be the other way around.

Those who wanted a written canon won the argument. …

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